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back to article Parliamentary wash-up washes away liberties

In the mad rush that is "parliamentary wash-up", it is traditional for civil liberties to be trampled to demonstrate that no party fails the "tough on crime" test – and 2010 is no exception. Thus it was that on 7 April, the House of Commons approved the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 (Amendment) Order 2010 – which categorises …

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There should be law against pushing stuff through in the wash-up. If they don't have time to properly debate these things they shouldn't be rushed through.

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Big Brother

Forget the wash up...

... there should be a law against the Parliamentary Guillotine which allows the Government to set a ridiculously short amount of time for *any* Bill to be discussed in the Commons, hence why the Dangerous Pictures provisions of the Criminal Justice and Immigration Act were only ever debated in the Lords.

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All politicos are twats ...

.. don't vote for any of them.

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Megaphone

Agreed

http://www.maniacworld.com/vote-for-nobody.jpg

viva la revolution!

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Washup

Agreed - this style of "government" is abhorrent and very undemocratic.

It is the exact opposite of why we put MP's in parliament in the first place.

They need to be reminded of that.

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Big Brother

"arrested for taking part in political activity"

Shudder

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FAIL

That's what happens when you elect incompetents

"the provisions for the DVPO are laid out in a level of operational detail more reminiscent of a management handbook than a UK Law."

A management handbook. Yup, that just about sums up this ridiculous bunch of second-raters. Where we should have had honed legal expertise, intelligent debate, reasoned argument and a willingness and ability to push back on the demands of the police to ensure a fair level of civil liberty, we've had to endure thirteen years of government by people who simply were not up to the job; and far worse, were too stupid to recognise their own limitations.

There were some outstanding exceptions - the late Mo Mowlam springs immediately to mind, with Robin Cook not far behind - but by and large this government has been an object lesson in what can be expected when you vote for numpties just because they didn't come from Eton and Oxford and were therefore down wid da kidz.

We should expect wisdom, experience, leadership, ability and statesmanship from the people we elect to rule over us. But we don't. We'd rather indulge in inverse snobbery and pride ourselves on voting against The Establishment, conveniently ignoring the fact that the people we're voting for have shown next to no ability to govern other than by straining when the tabloid press and/or the White House says shit.

Sod it, I'm off to join the SNLA.

See you on the barricades, comrades!

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Anonymous Coward

Yes, I remember

When Thatcher was in and seemed like she'd never be out, I looked at who Labour had and figured we were doomed because they were such as you say 'second raters'. I used to watch this lot on Question Time and be so annoyed at how stupid and useless they were I felt like kicking the telly in. And now they're not only the Government, but their level of incompetence is now considered political talent.

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Coat

@Mike Smith

"but by and large this government has been an object lesson in what can be expected when you vote for numpties just because they didn't come from Eton and Oxford and were therefore down wid da kidz."

A delightfully class bound view of the UK political situation.

Tony Blair might not have gone to Eaton but he (and Jacqui smith) are both Oxbridge graduates. It could be argued that Blairs Jurisprudence is more directly useful than Smith's PPE (A popular choice with senior civil servants, wanabee senior politicians and various assorted financial chancers) Gordon Brown's degree was at Edinburgh History (not sure what his PhD is in. Yes that does make him Dr Brown)

All of the above went to *good* universities. I'd suspect most of the rest of the Cabinet did as well.

Forget the "Man of the people" Vs "Tory boy" PR BS. Most of them did well (in fact Brown did better than Blair on grades) academically.

But then some academics cannot find their a"£se with both hands.

Mine will be the one with the Wiki donation form in the pocket.

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Megaphone

@John Lilburne

Wouldn't work. A non-vote is not a no-vote.

The only way forward is to break up the Party system by everyone voting for an independent candidate.

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@WonkoTheSane

Nor would everybody voting for an independent candidate; you would have Government by comittiee which would mean paralysis in central Government. However I appluad you for at least offering a sugesstion.

Actually, I think this will be the last GE wherre we see the two party system. I'd wager you will see a few seats being won by single issue parties and thos who only two GE's ago would have been on the very outside of the political system.

Personally I just feel that a vote for either the Tories, Lab or the Lib-Dems is just a vote for another bunch of robbing shits who happen to wear a different colour.

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""would mean paralysis in central Government"

Surely that would be a vast improvement.

Compare the legislation that has been written over the last 13 years with a big bucket of nothing. The bucket is vastly superior. Admittedly the bucket doesn't provide us with minimum wage, or allow gay people to sort-of marry, but that is more than balanced out by the masses of terrible terrible laws it doesn't contain.

Ideally I would like a government that knew when to shut up and leave things alone, but failing that one that was too busy infighting to much anything up for anyone else would have to do.

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Happy

Mr Brown "promises" electoral reform

It's been on his to-do list for the last 13 years but it's something he feels passionately about and *now* is the time for action.*

*The above statement is 50% true.

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