back to article LHC particle-punisher in record 7 TeV hypercollisions

It's official: as this is written, the most powerful particle collisions ever achieved by the human race are taking place inside the great subterranean detector caverns of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). An initial hiccup this morning saw an overly-jumpy automatic protection system quench a magnet and dump one of the beams, but …

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Joke

when will they start

colliding aircraft carriers?

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Happy

"We could not contain the joy..."

Does an alarm sound when that happens?

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Go

Re: "We could not contain the joy..."

No, it gets dumped just in case it gets out of hand.

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Coat

Surely...

...that's a containment breach?

/coat|taxi

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Happy

"... riotous scenes took place in the control rooms..."

Where's my crowbar?

Top stuff science type bods!

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Flame

Paging Dr. Freeman...

There'll be a resonance cascade by bedtime, you mark my words.

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Welcome

Playmobil reconstruction, shurely

""We could not contain the joy," reported a CERN spokeswoman as riotous scenes took place in the control rooms earlier on."

Love the LHC stuff, keep it coming. One thing does worry me - what if the doommongeres like Dr. Dark Energy do turn out to be right? Surely that will mean

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all the world's top physicists were right

For now. There is still plenty of time for something unexpected to happen. If they were 100% sure what was going to happen, there would be no need for the experiment in the first place now would there?

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http://twitter.com/CERN

As always at:

http://twitter.com/CERN

good going guys & gals - keep hitting those rocks together!

ttfn

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Happy

Still here...

http://hasthelargehadroncolliderdestroyedtheworldyet.com/

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title? title!

one of these days, that site should be changed to say "Yes." just for funsies.

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Source code..

The source code of that page is lovely:

if (!(typeof worldHasEnded == "undefined")) {

document.write("YUP.");

} else {

document.write("NOPE.");

}

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Fantastic

That is all.

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Cool and congrats...

So now I have question - a dumb one; but one I hope somebody in the particle physics arena can answer.

What precisely will knowing if there are larger mass particles or prove symmetry or the existence of Higgs particles mean for us?

I mean - longer life batteries, faster cars, improvements in energy consumption....?

I don't precisely know what this and the large financial investment is all meant to lead to.

... genuine question!

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What will ... mean for us

That's always the challenge for pure science: demonstrating value to the bean counters.

Pure science delivers advances in the long term, but they will not be delivered by pure science, but by technologists exploiting what the pure science reveals.

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Clod

Yes, Mr. Rutherford, you've split an atom, but I'm afraid I can't really see the use for half an atom.

Have you considered a different degree? Perhaps something practical, like the emerging field of "media studies".

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All those things and potentially more

Understanding the fundamental particle physics means there are greater possibilities for industrial processes in the future. Fusion reactors?

Then again, knowledge for the sake of knowledge is always a worthwhile pursuit IMO - it doesn't HAVE to be able to be turned into a product. Understanding the nature of the universe is important

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Who's the third?

Said by Eddington (or so it's believed) about people who understand relativity. The number is much higher today.

Without relativity today, GPS wouldn't work. That's just one example. Most theoretical physics is done without any practical applications in mind. That's challenge two :-)

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Go

What's in it for us?

If I follow the storyline, faster aircraft carriers.

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Pint

Top Stuff, Sir!

"Tinfoilclad doom prophets around the world - fearing some kind of planet-imploding black hole mishap, planetary soupening or custardisation event etc - no doubt found it a trouser-moistening moment"

All of this goodness, packed into a single sentence.

Give this man a beer, or two!

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Coat

that's why its rainigg?

I live in geneva, and its been raining straight since midday, now I know why!

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Joke

Quantum hop

Well it's been raining here in London for what feels like weeks now and it stopped at midday. Apparently the the LHC caused a discontinuity in the space-time continuum, and our weather jumped to Geneva.

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Yay

Hooray for tiny explosions a long way underground!

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Why not try for 14TeV now?

Soooo... if it's scheduled to be off-line for a year anyway, and the outcome of a possible failure is similar to the last time it blew up, then why don't they just try a full-power run for a laff? What's the worst that can happen? Oh, it's offline for a year to fix it. Erm...

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Possibly

Something that would cost £2bn to repair after ramming it up to full capacity could only cost £1bn to shore up so that if you ram it up to full capacity then it doesn't break?

A Cost/benefits analysis has probably decided that it makes better financial sense to not take the risk.

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That and the fact

It will probably take them the year it's down to process all the data they get from the 7TeV collisions.

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Unhappy

The worst that could happen?

It might work and put all those upgrading geeks on the dole.

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Coat

Nice!

Great way to put it! 'trouser-moistening moment'

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FAIL

Boo! Hiss!

I want my catastrophic ensoupening, and I want it now! Booooo!

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Happy

CERN..

You can see the experiments live here:

http://www.cyriak.co.uk/lhc/lhc-webcams.html

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Happy

Raining in Geneva

Confirmed... and it's not like it ever rains in Geneva, does it? errrm, no, hold on....

Driving back into town after work, not sure if I should be more wary of inter-dimensional pan-galactic denizens or hordes of cheering inebriated boffins

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Alert

Don't be too sure

Even as we speak, MICROSCOPIC black holes may be OSCILLATING back and forth through the EARTH ITSELF accumulating MASS as they go. It could take WEEKS or DECADES before we learn the TRUTH.

Meanwhile, look for very small holes in the floor.

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Grenade

well

Statistically speaking something did happen after the first particles collided today. Idiotic save the world cultists around the world shut the feck up for a while. We need to do this more often.

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Boffin

Crossing beams? Always a bad idea

Having established their stability, these beams were allowed to cross paths and collide.

This 7 TeV event, which took place on Tuesday at 1200 BST, was the highest energy yet achieved in a particle accelerator.

"This is new territory," said Professor Tonelli.

and then promptly shuts it down for a year for maintenance and any signs of Parallel Micro Universes or Time Wave Distortions.

What a bunch of Tesla Teezers:+~

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Strange

I dont seem to be able to understand what this Vortigon in front of me is saying...

mine's the one with the help hints on how to finish that strider bit on EP2

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ep2

"mine's the one with the help hints on how to finish that strider bit on EP2"

Yarr. Took me a couple of deaths before I realised I could just smack the wee doggy things over with the car. Very easy after that. Almost like... cheating?

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Dammit

I'm just about to start Ep2. That'll teach me for being 2 years behind everyone else.

And it's Vortigaunt.

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FAIL

I guess...

...that means I actually have to GO to my meeting this afternoon then.

Bugger.

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custardisation event?

Bring it on! Yummy!

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Boffin

A minor correction...

"lightspeed 3.5 tera-electron-volt (TeV) protons"

Well, they can either be at light speed, or have an energy of 3.5 TeV. I'm sure that any physicist will point out to you that the energy of the particles is due to a combination of mass and velocity and, due to relativity, as they approach the speed of light, their mass, and therefore energy, approaches infinity. Hence only massless particles (such as photons) can travel at the speed of light...

As I said, its a minor correction, but an important one. The protons are actually accelerated to around 99.99% the speed of light.

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Headmaster

or more accurately

99.9999991% of the speed of light

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Happy

Thanks

I did scout around the interweb to find the correct number, but after not finding immediately, and being daunted by the though of having to apply my brain to some hard maths, relented and used the first number I found.

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Re : or more accurately

Just round it up !

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Anonymous Coward

Coincidence or what....

Did anybody else's lights flicker? We lost a couple of internet pipe too.... spooky !!!

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WTF?

In Portland, Dorset

And Dorchester, and Weymouth, we had a power cut for nearly 20 minutes.. At 12:00. No coincidence, surely?!

Oh well, at least I got to test the UPS's at work :-)

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but.......

has anyone has a flash forward yet?

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Boffin

Here's to pure maths, and may it never be of any use....

@...So now I have question - a dumb one; but one I hope somebody in the particle physics arena can answer.

What precisely will knowing if there are larger mass particles or prove symmetry or the existence of Higgs particles mean for us?

I mean - longer life batteries, faster cars, improvements in energy consumption....?...@

The way it works is that pure research is usually completely without application when it's done. It simply raises the curtain about how things work a little more. Like Democritus around 400BC, when he developed the concept of the atom - there was nothing you could do with it then.

Fast forward a couple of thousand years, and you get a limitless source of energy for mankind....

I don't precisely know what this and the large financial investment is all meant to lead to.

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Don't you just...

...hate it when something on the internet screws with your keyboard layout?

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Xen

Where's Gordon Freeman when you need him?

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Coincidentally...

... I started watching Fringe last night. Managed about 20 minutes of an episode from an online "cache" and decided it was worth a look. £20 later and I own the first series! Here's hoping there's some references to atom-smashing and other wonderful sciency gubbins to explain the 6th-sense style words in the intro.

(Psst... Hey, big media. Yeah, I saw 20 minutes of your show from an unlicensed source AND THEN BOUGHT THE WHOLE FIRST SEASON. Think about it...)

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