back to article German court rejects police data snooping store

Germany's High Court has told police and secret services that they must stop storing email and telephone data and delete information already collected. The storage of six months' worth of German comms data for police and anti-terrorism purposes was required by a European Union directive. Opponents of the snooping measure hoped …

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Anonymous Coward

Why can't UK Supreme Court act?

Just a question, that's all........

It is not as if it is about money or profits, is it?

If they can act on 'Libel Tourism' - which is a grosse infringement of journalistic freedom - then surely they can act on this as well?

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One down...

...many more to go.

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Anonymous Coward

Preeemptive surveillance

You might be a criminal in FUTURE ergo we treat you like a criminal NOW, pre-emptively removing your privacy right so we have evidence of your future crimes.

If you want your privacy back, can you prove you are not a criminal in the future? I thought not!

Why don't we lock you up today and you can confess tomorrow, by the same logic.

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Anonymous Coward

Says it all...

"but instead the court found that data was not properly protected and that authorities were not sufficiently clear as to why they needed it."

What more can you say? Horah the Germans. If only the UK could take a leaf out of their book ... but unfortunately our own government is as power hungry as our police are.

Is East Sussex to become the new Eastern Blok? Will chilly Aberdeen become the new Moscow? Looks like the UK is facing a political cold war within our own borders. What next ... the Watford Wall running from Leeds down to the sea?

Life in the UK continues to get ever more frosty, and I ain't talkin' about the weather.

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Sounds great to me!

You have a problem with running a wall round Watford or Leeds?! Not me, I'll even help build it and ensure there's no gaps or doors!

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Better idea

Build the wall round Westminster - and put a roof over it.

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Anonymous Coward

For the land of the free...

...they are being awfully nosy. And Europe has for far too long just acquiesced or outright supported that attitude. In fact, European citizens are far worse of than American ones. Frankly, while this is reasonably good news, it's only a drop on a hot plate -- not nearly enough.

Next to mopping up the damage from the terrorist scare kneejerking fest and resulting security circus, we --as in us the citizens forcing our politicians do to the right things for once-- basically need to make sure of two things:

First, we need a government ID management system that enforces privacy and allows for things like multiple identities, reputation grading, social mobility, and a host of other related features. This will be tricky, but quite necessairy, and when done well we only need to do it once. Most important is being able to prove entitlement to something or to hand over a well-defined limited subset without handing over the entire dossier, as is the case now.

Second, we need to very carefully decide what access to information law enforcement may force under what circumstances. After that you can figure out the details like what needs to be stored and for how long. I say most privacy-sensitive information that isn't already public ought to require a court order of sorts, simply to keep indepentent track of where the police are sticking their noses now. I also would not accept ``preventive'' gathering of information in any way or form.

In that sense this German ruling goes a long way to being a fairly positive one.

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It's a start...

... now we need to see this sort of sensible thinking extended over the rest of the EU (and eventually Britain) so all the unnecessary, represessive "Big Brother Is Watching You" laws brought in to "protect us" from the Terrorist bogeyman are rolled back...

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Pint

Don't mention the 'w' word.

I wonder what our great grandparents would have thought, if they knew their descendents would look at Germany's democratic freedoms with envy.

Beer glass, because I can't have a Stein.

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Big Brother

Sad but true.

sigh.

What Americans are not getting is that the Government and Business are on much different pages regarding Security and Privacy.

Our Spooks and Cops keep their data secure until they are ready to take action - fine, an unintended consequence is that they keep data Private.

Business "Security" is a perimeter defense set up to keep "their" data from Competitors. Their idea of keeping data Private is running out of things to know about you, because it all may help sell you something in the future.

Not forgetting for a moment that "Financial Sector" is just barely differentiable into Public and Private segments, Americans see no difference between Big Brother and Big Brother Incorporated.

Big Brother does not compile the SWIFT data and is shocked, shocked to learn that "National Security" efforts are being frustrated. Meanwhile, any suggestion of Privacy concerns are defined as "Anti-Business".

What has Americans baffled is the odd confluence of "desperate" need for the data for two different purposes when we have no history of dissent on either "National Security" or "Pro-Business" Policy. Where did these European Privacy Nuts come from anyway ?

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Boffin

EU Data Renteion Directive. Made in Britian

But voted on when IIRC Germany had the presidency.

This POS legislation is likely to be one of Tony Blair longer standing legacies.

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