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back to article Microsoft's wiretap guide goes online, security site goes offline

Long-established privacy and cryptology website Cryptome.org was pulled offline on Wednesday after Microsoft launched a legal offensive over its publication of Redmond's guide to internet wiretapping. Microsoft's Global Criminal Compliance Handbook, a 22 page booklet designed solely for police and intelligence services, provides …

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Silver badge

Microsoft [and Network Solutions] doing the King Canute and Darth Vader thing.

Sledgehammer ...... Meet Nuts, says it all Succinctly and Sublimely.

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Big Brother

Criky

{shiver}

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Sounds like it might be interesting...

...or it might just be a load of procedural guff for navigating your way through the corporate minefield - i.e. who to speak to etc. Anyone read it? Anything interesting in there?

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Thumb Up

it's not interesting

I would not have even heard of this, but for the fuss. Found it in 30 secs (pdf), but it doesn't contain anything special that is not either well known or can be looked up, but it does look pretty, well laid out, all in one place. Am I a spy now? or a hacker?

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Anonymous Coward

Choice Quotes

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Microsoft also provides some country specific domains such as .co.uk, .fr, .it, .de, .es, .th, .tk, .co.jp

* Currently all e-mail service customer data is stored in the U.S. even if the account name contains a country specific domain.

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E-mail account registration records are retained for the life of the account. Internet Protocol (“IP”) connection history records are retained for 60 days.

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Windows Live Spaces: The Windows Live Spaces online service enables customers to reach out to others by publishing their THOUGHTS, PHOTOS, and INTERESTS in an easy way.....

[ask for] Any and all website information for the [Space requested] including content, photos, blogs, lists, and all IIS logs... source of payment of any such paid subscription records associated with the owner’s e-mail account as well as associated IP history for the account.

....information for the visitor [visitor name] of the Space [Space name] including means and source of payment of any such paid account and associated IP logs for these accounts.

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Seems you DO need a US subpoena to get email content older than 180 days and a warrant to get email less than 180 days. Now I have the document. So what is the subpoena protection for data for non US citizens held in the US?

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Pint

it gets better . . .

you can even find it with bing. Well if I can anyone can.

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Hey, Bro. Where's IT @? ...And What's Happening?

"Sounds like it might be interesting... Anyone read it? Anything interesting in there?" ....... Dan 10 Posted Thursday 25th February 2010 10:44 GMT

Only all your information belongs to us. And Obviously QuITe Preposterously Delusional.

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FAIL

M$ data retention policies

I noticed that you said: "So what is the subpoena protection for data for non US citizens held in the US?" And that is a damn good question!

It is one reason why I strongly recommend that companies NOT move to any "cloud" services until these important legal questions are answered.

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FAIL

http://cryptomeorg.siteprotect.net/

That's the new site BTW.

Network Solutions are such tossers. I ran screaming from them at the first opportunity, and have been very happy at gandi.net ever since (who were the first registrar I found who's T&Cs stated that the domain belonged to you, and they were simply hosting it for you -- it's run by Debian geeks as well, which I find reassuring)

As for NSI, before I fled I tried submitting one of their web forms to make a change to my domain, not realising that the form would simply send me a mail with my submission in it, which I'd then have to mail in anyway. Four months later, I got the mail. Examining the Received: headers revealed that it had spent 4 months going from _their_ web server to _their_ mail server, and then seven seconds later it was in my inbox -- and these were the people being trusted to keep the internet running at the time -- scary.

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Go

+1

Aye, big up Gandi for all your DNS, hosting, SSL etc. needs - great service, good prices.

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To Mr Young

In case you read this : Your work is important. It's got to keep on going.

We need the information you publish because of the lack of honesty from

the US government , corporations and people everywhere that benifit from

disinforming us or squarely lying to us. We need Cryptome and the published

information for the simple reason that some people want us to be ignorant

and that cannot be. We need to know and have a right to know.

Specially if the ones who are doing the spying is the ones who provide us

with the OS in the first place. If im spyed on by MS i wanna know.

It's MY computer not your's ! Thank god i use Linux at home and windows

at work. where i dont give a hoot.

I can't bear the thought that they are there watching everything i do ,dutifully reporting

to the US agencies and make money in the process.

And you guys outside the US should be worried too to use Windows ..

Sending data about your web activities to the US for scrutiny . Wake up.

Get rid of the spyware you call windows once and for all . Say no to be spied on

by a corporation all too willing to hand your data over to foreign ( US ) authorities.

It's a disgrace. What a shame ! Windows : say . no , thanks .

Good work . Keep going

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Black Helicopters

InterNetional Federal Rescue ..... Helicopter Ben's Ride!?. :-)

"And you guys outside the US should be worried too to use Windows ..

Sending data about your web activities to the US for scrutiny . Wake up." .... FuzzyTheBear Posted Thursday 25th February 2010 11:47 GMT ... To Mr Young

The Facility does Allow Uncle Sam to Invest in that which IT Finds ..... in Semantic Alien Projects. SMARTer MkUltra Sensitive Astute.

Capiche?

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Joke

22 pages?

Why so long?

All you need for hotmail accounts is the password, and we know how easy they are.

password

lolz

qwerty

123456

etc...

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Anonymous Coward

Copyright vs free speech

Another case of over-strong copyright law being used to prevent public interest speech by Netsol.

It's got some pretty nasty stuff in it.

1. All your data, no matter for what domain, e.g. .UK, . FR, .CH is held on servers in the US and hence subject to US law. So you may have a privacy right in your home country, but Microsoft services don't enforce that, they enforce US law instead.

2. All log in information is kept (including IP addresses) and available on request, WITHOUT a warrant or subpoena. EMAIL CONTENT MORE THAN 180 DAYS OLD, can be obtained WITHOUT A WARRANT OR SUBPOENA.

3. There is a notification under US law for email content over 180 days, which does not apply to non Americans, so they have to tell US citizens when their data is grabbed. Outside the US, our rights are as bad as the British rights, i.e. none.

4. The practical upshot of this is that everyone in the world using Microsoft services can have their data grabbed by a Sergeant Tazee McClubby, on a whim, regardless of whatever legal protection you think you have, and he can ogle photos of your wife from 6 months ago and you cannot stop him.

5. The cooperation treaties likely mean that foreign governments can access that data on similar terms. So imagine your worst enemy being able to see the intimate details of your private life.

Nasty. I never realized that private emails can be obtains without even a warrant just because they're old.

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Anonymous Coward

*WITH* Subpoena

It needs a subpoena, the source I quoted is incorrect, you can get the document from Wikileaks.

Still doesn't change my opinion of this. How exactly can a European challenge a US issued subpoena, or even have knowledge of it, or even expect the US to treat them fairly given a different set of cultural biases?

The data needs to be stored in the country to which it's user has their rights, and data needs to expire.

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Anonymous Coward

mmmmk

got copy

easy to find

if anyone wants, post

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Of course MS can be trusted with all your private data

Its not like MS's own secrets ever get posted on the internet.

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Big Brother

Where does law enforcement goals end and polical manipulation start?

It seems the Streisand Effect is working wonders to spread this far and wide :)

I have no problem with this from a law enforcement perspective, if and only if they are trying to stop the occasional sociopath from causing others harm. What worries me is how these increasingly extensive spying capabilities can be abused, because as soon as the arrogant self-centered sociopaths in governments get new legal powers over people, some of them uses the laws to abuse others. We keep seeing that with the anti-terror laws.

Although I would say I find the amount of spying capabilities they now have more than a bit shocking. Its not just email, its also things like Instant Messaging, Social Networking Services, Blogs, Windows Live ID, Online File Storage and even Xbox Live.

For example, via Xbox Live, they can for example get your credit card details. So by adding in money laundering laws, they can then also watch your bank accounts, which in turn allows them to monitor what you purchase. (Even with just XBox its not just credit cards, its also things like e.g. Date of birth, name, e-mail address, physical address, telephone, credit card number, type of credit card, credit card expiration date, Microsoft Passport). When crime TV shows bring up all these details, its (in the past) looked very false to me, but what Microsoft are doing is basically exactly that. Makes me wonder how many other companies have these secret spying deals.

Also the scope of Windows Live ID is disturbing. That allows them to monitor everywhere its used.

It amazes me how fast our world is becoming very Orwellian. Its as if the governments have (finally) woken up (in about the past 5 years) to how much power technology gives them and now there seems to be little holding them back from really going for it big time. :(

(A lot of the 1984 book is about how people police themselves into silence, through fear Big Brother *maybe* watching them at any moment (even if most of the time Big Brother was not always watching them. Fear of punishment for speaking out keeps most people in line to follow their ruling elite's wishes. So for example, how long before buying the 1984 book will instantly win you fast track bonus profiling points on your way to being labeled a domestic extremist (after all you maybe made more of a risk of becoming political after reading it, so you could try to oppose our ruling elite). (Apparently its already banned in some countries, I wonder why?! :(

So how many more companies are getting into this ever growing automated spying business?

Wonderful, another day and another step towards an Orwellian world. :(

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Welcome

Hmmmm ...

And to think the White House and the GOP National Committee "lost" all those emails.

Did anybody think to look on Microsoft's servers ?

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Virtual Controls

"And to think the White House and the GOP National Committee "lost" all those emails.

Did anybody think to look on Microsoft's servers ?" ..... Anonymous Coward Posted Thursday 25th February 2010 13:55 GMT.

Hmmmm ... Powerful Leverage there.

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Big Brother

El Reg

Does El Reg have one of those deals with the Big Brother?

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Happy

u have to ask?

Wellllll..... seeing as the data is likely stored in the U.K. somewhere.....

I would put it as pretty likely that you can be found.

Obfuscate enough and you can buy some time if you are worried.

It was sweet of them to provide an Orwell icon though

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Happy

u have to ask?

Wellllll..... seeing as the data is likely stored in the U.K. somewhere.....

I would put it as pretty likely that you can be found.

Obfuscate enough and you can buy some time if you are worried.

It was sweet of them to provide an Orwell icon though

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