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back to article Web manhunt child abuser gets 20 years

A US child abuser who became the target of an internet manhunt last year has been jailed for nearly 20 years after abusing boys as young as six. Wayne Nelson Corliss, 60, was sent to prison for 19 and a half years and ordered to pay $5,000 by a court in Newark, New Jersey on Monday, AFP reports. Corliss was arrested in May last …

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N2
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19.5 years...

Is that it, after all that?

Old sparky would sort em out - with an extra electrode for the paedos

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Prosecuted for a crime in another country?

This worries me somewhat - shouldn't he have been prosecuted in thailand if he commited the crime there? How can the US court impose a sentence when no crime has been commited in the US? Are they just taking it upon themselves to be a world court now? And what about the other way around - someone does something thats illegal in their home country but not the country they commit the act? The age of consent for example is 14 in spain which could lead to all sorts of issues. I can't help thinking that courts and judges in general have a rather too high estimate of their own importance.

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@boltar

As much as I hate the USA attitude - this isn't unique to the USA.

You can be tried for sexual offences outwith the UK, by a UK court, upon your return to the UK. And yes, that includes buggering 14 year old Spanish boys.

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RE: 19.5 years...

At which point he will be 80 and living on prison food. Can't see him getting out alive can you?

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WTF?

tough punishment.. wtf

20 yrs.

try robbin a bank and see what tough means.

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WTF?

@Boltar

You underestimate the power of the Paedogeddon. Whilst it's proving curiously impossible for the combined might and technical prowess of the world's intelligence services to track down a sickly, bearded terrorist allegedly living in some caves somewhere in Afghanistan, global police forces seem to have no problem - or hesitation - in expending every effort to track down and expose (loudly, usually at organised press events) 'most wanted' paedophiles. It's becoming a sort of international sport, enjoyed mostly by competing police forces.

Imposing sentences on nationals who commit their crimes abroad has also been 'fast-tracked' to expedite the swift trial and summary justice handed out to paedophiles - it can at least be argued they - alone, it seems, in the criminal fraternity - enjoy a faster, more 'efficient' process at the hands of police and courts than do terrorists and murderers, who's cases seem to clog up the system for years at a time.

When you occupy the very lowest rung on the criminal ladder - below even suicide bombers or genocidal dictators - justice is a very difficult commodity to come by, as paedophiles are finding out to their cost.

It really does seem to be the case that fiddling about with small boys is somehow far, far more serious (and worthy of investigation) than any number of deaths caused by drunk driving, or the 80+ or so children in England and Wales alone who die each year at the hands of parents or carers (NSPCC's own reporting), or, say, stealing the wealth of entire corporate pension funds or even, God forbid, waging illegal wars around the world, causing the deaths of countless hundreds of thousands of men, women and children.

We put all that on hold, it seems, in our zeal to see these 'predators' brought to justice - or, at least, to what these days passes for justice. I think it's what a government Minister here in the UK helpfully referred to as 'the court of public opinion'.

Cardinal Richelieu would be proud.

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Thumb Up

Great but...

It's great that a piece of dirt like this was caught, but now the Euro GOVs will have more excuses to put ID and internet security on the bill and nail the rest of use down!

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Extra-territorial Legislation

Rather than a case of the US trying to police the world it's probably just a case of extra-territorial legislation.

Most legislation is territorial so only applies to crimes committed in a country by either nationals or visitors. A minority of legislation is extra-territorial and applies to nationals both in the country and over-seas.

I believe the UK passed an extra-territorial law around child abuse to counter exactly this sort of case. We also have extra-territorial laws around the arms trade, to prevent UK nationals selling arms indirectly that would be illegal to sell directly*.

* Though it's got more holes in it than a fishing net.

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Coat

@AC 12:45 GMT

Madoff was caught AFTER these guys, and went to jail for 150 years BEFORE the first one of them (this guy).

Try ripping off rich people. It will get you the fast track like you wouldn't believe.

Mine's the orange one...

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Anonymous Coward

The photo that Interpol posted...

...looks like Pete Waterman, the famous music mogul. Good job he wasn't arrested for the crime!

Here is the photo of the perv http://www.theregister.co.uk/2008/05/06/interpol_picture_hunt/

and a photo of Pete Waterman http://www.contactmusic.com/photos.nsf/main/sheilas_07_wenn1579500

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I have no problem...

...with countries dealing with their own citizens mis-behaving in other people's countries.

When they start assuming responsibility for foreign nationals behaving legally in their own foreign countries but against local country laws (I'm thinking of a certain Russian security researcher) that takes the biscuit!

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FAIL

Billy No-mates

"Whilst it's proving curiously impossible for the combined might and technical prowess of the world's intelligence services to track down a sickly, bearded terrorist allegedly living in some caves somewhere in Afghanistan, global police forces seem to have no problem - or hesitation - in expending every effort to track down and expose (loudly, usually at organised press events) 'most wanted' paedophiles."

Well Bin Laden and co have quite a few followers who rather like and admire what they do to hide amongst. I've a hunch these sick c*nts don't enjoy quite the same popularity...

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FAIL

to AC @ 20:51gmt

Apparently you don't watch the sensationalistic "news" reporting television shows. If you appear to be rich, and walk down the street in Thailand (and other countries), the 10yo will try to rent you his 7yo brother or sister.

Besides, In another 150 years, marrying 12yo's will be normal again.

AC, who? me?

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Megaphone

BURN THE WITCH!

BURN HIM! BURN! BURN! BURN!

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Anonymous Coward

@Thailand

Well, I live here quite a bit of the time and no one seems to be offerering babies to me. But it should hardly surprise you that sensationalist TV promotes a different image.

"Underage" sex whatever that may be, is generally a thai-thai thing, because the laws were made to satisfy the prudish lobbyists in Washington and other western religious imperialists, not the Thai society which has (depending upon where in Thailand, or for that matter SE Asia one is), a different view. While it does happen here as in other places in the world, it is hardly the problem that self righteous bigots on TV make out, and on the general SE Asian scale, Thailand is far from the the hotspot.

My personal objection is the age differential laws, in coutnries like Australia, which make fairly ordinary relationships illegal and punishabable by gaol. I was married only 20 years ago, and today, I would have been categorised as one to "burn, burn, burn" according to Aussie laws. My wife and I find this hilarious as does our daughter.

And as for Thailand, well the Saudi funded, trained and ideologically educated muslim terrorists in the South with absolutely no grievance to speak of, seem perfectly happy to slaughter school children, teachers, monks and random innocent bystanders whenever the mood takes them.

Teenagers having sex is a trivial problem compared to muslim fanatics financed by oil money slaughtering the innocents with AK47s.

Get a grip!

nuff said.

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