back to article Wi-Fi body to highlight 802.11n aerial counts

The Wi-Fi Alliance (WFA) has celebrated the recent ratification - at long, long last - of the 802.11n standard by updating its logo for certified wireless networking kit. But it's not simply removing the 'Draft' text from its existing logo - it is to add an indication of the number of spatial streams a given product can handle …

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Coat

Playground one-upmanship - geek stylie:

"My dad's router's got more aerials than your dad's router."

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Happy

Aerials / Antenna, make your mind up

My aerial is bigger than yours !!!

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Bronze badge

Ho hum

"The organisation also said it will impose "channel coexistence measures" to ensurer certified kit doesn't hinder other WLANs when it's operating at 40MHz in the 2.4GHz band."

But it's still on 2.4GHz which is far too congested in most urban settings. So if you're surrounded by 802.11b/g and door bells and baby monitors and the like your wireless performance will still be appalling.

I'll stick to my interference free 802.11a thanks. Sure it's only 54Mb, but it's a rock solid interference free 54Mb.

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Gold badge
Flame

Streams and co-existing

STREAMS

So the standard logo will clear things up by saying that a unit has either dual ( which means "2") streams, which is the minimum, or multi (which means "more than 1") streams. That is __SO__ much clearer, thanks. Much better than saying "2 Streams" or "4 Streams", "10 Streams", etc.

CO-EXISTING

So at last they recognise that there will be more than 2 WiFi units within 50 miles of each other. The units will have a way of ensuring that they do not all sit on only one channel, even though they are not all part of the same network? no?

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Co Exist?

I live in a decently large building, with lots of wifi networks. My solution to the interference problem was simply to get a 600mW (as opposed to the standard 80mW or so) transmit power access point, with a 12dB omni antenna. The key is just to make interference Somebody Else's Problem. Seeing as how I can't get more than 20 feet from the antenna while staying inside my apartment, I tend not to notice any. I don't really expect to see more than 2.5 MB/s (significantly slower than my internet connection) over wifi, but if it's really an issue, I can always grab a 75 ft cat6 cable and get gigabit aaaanywhere in my whole tiny flat.

Now that they've finally finished the standard, it might be worth buying some N speed kit... in a couple months after everyone's had time to release a new hardware revision.

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Stop

Channel co-existence methods.....hmmmmmmm

A few weeks back I suddenly acquired couldn't connect to my wireless G network syndrome. This coincided with the appearance of a new network in my network list, turns out it was my neighbours. Happily it was totally open so I was able to restrict it to wireless G only and stick them on a different channel. Naturally they haven't noticed any difference and I'm back to a useable network.

Wireless 'n' is a nuisance and like most of USB just a marketing gimmick. Most domestic home networks don't need this capability.

I can only imagine the carnage these things will cause in flats etc. Co-existence methods my arse!

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Happy

Wireless N is innovative and much faster

Wireless N is like 300M speed and has dual/multiple antennas to assure good received and transmit. N is designed to bounce around walls and cover your whole house.

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