back to article Dell Latitude 2100

A side-effect of Dell's last internal reorganisation is that the company has separate teams working on very similar products but aimed at different kinds of user. Taking the case in hand, the Latitude 2100 is a netbook aimed at major organisations – primarily educational – who want to buy machines of a predetermined spec in bulk …

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FAIL

Would be a winner with the kids...

If it was waterproof. Putting a strap on it is just asking for trouble.

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WTF?

Vostro next?

So, will there be a Dell Vostro netbook next from the small business team?

A lot of Vostros are very similar to Studio/Inspiron laptops, just more boring.

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Pirate

More importantly

Is it as easily hackintoshed as the old Mini9?

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Re: Other article today.

You know, the one about ditching brand names when they get to be a joke?

Is there anyone out there who doesn't automatically read "Latitude" as "Lassitude" these days in connection with Dell? That name has a well-earned reputation for "exactly like everyone else's product of the same spec only a lot slower.".

In this case it would appear that such misgivings are misplaced, but the name still puts me off.

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Please include VAT & delivery charges in your reviews

Hateful Dell charge £20 for delivery, bumping up the ACTUAL price of the base model to £317.40. At that price things like its miserly 80 GB hard disk start to seem like poor value. They even have the audacity to charge £16 (less VAT, of course) if you would like one in blue, green, red or yellow as opposed to the default black!

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rubbery powerbook?

"It's a unique netbook feature as far as we know and we have to ask why it hasn't been done before."

Not a netbook, but Apple's 1998/9 Powerbooks Wall Street and Pismo were rubber covered.

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JB
Happy

I rather like it

Just to be different. I like angular stuff, why does everything have to be curved these days? I like the rubberised coating, no creasy fingerprints all over a shiny surface. Yes, the spec is pretty mediocre, but if all you're going to use it for is surf the web and a bit of office now and again, who needs super-dooper processing power? If I had some spare cash (damn economy!) I'd snap one up tomorrow.

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Anonymous Coward

Nice, but...

It's a real shame its not dockable, I would have been tempted to buy one otherwise. Presumably that's why its not called the E2100, as only the E-Series are dockable in the current range.

Maybe they were worried about cannibalizing potential sales of 'proper' Latitudes, although I can't believe that many enterprise sales would have been lost to an Atom-powered netbook like this.

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I like it

I bought one of these a couple of weeks ago to use for travelling and I have found it to be fantastic, especially the touchscreen - I now find myself using the touchscreen all the time when using Firefox, Openoffice and Outlook, something that I never thought I would do.

I give this netbook an A-, the only thing stopping it from being an A+ for me are:

- I had to dismantle the laptop to install the second 1GB RAM - why couldn't Dell have given me a 2GB pre-installed option on the website? I hate having to remove laptop keyboards, especially brand new ones.

- I find myself using a stylus from an old PDA but I'm sure I'm going to lose it because the Latitude 2100 touchscreen version doesn't come with a stylus slot. I know that might seem like an odd request for a netbook, but having used the touchscreen for a couple of weeks I really miss having a stylus always available in a little slide-out slot.

By the way, I think there is a tiny inaccuracy in the review - the activity light on the back is not configurable; you have no choice, it is always on.

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