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back to article Second open-source Silverlight hits beta

The second edition of the open-source edition of Microsoft's Silverlight media player has been released to beta testing. Moonlight, which puts the Silverlight player on Unix and Linux, updates the initial open-source player with fixes tackling security and performance. Project leader Miguel de Icaza is reported to have said he …

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Anonymous Coward

Catch Up

Speaking to The Reg earlier, de Icaza noted Moonlight would not include all the Silverlight 3.0 features, specifically those in workflow

So Moonlight is - as predicted by most of the Linux community - in catch-up mode, not able to do what big business will soon find imperative.

I'm so surprised I think I need to lie down.

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Badgers

Well, here's hoping...

that it has a lot fewer security holes than Adobe Flash.

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Stop

lies, all lies

"The second edition of the open-source edition of Microsoft's Silverlight media player has been released to beta testing."

Moonlight is no open-source edition of Silverlight... and it's definitively not from Microsoft.

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Gates Horns

Bloody Mono

I keep having to expunge it from my systems. I wish Miguel Icaza would just go get a job writing .NET apps at Microsoft or something instead of poisoning my systems with Microsoft proprietary crap of dubious legality.

Oh, and WHERE THE HELL IS THE EVIL BALLMER ICON!

Bill? Bill is dead man!

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Gates Horns

Like he said

Moonlight is no open-source edition of Silverlight... and it's definitively not from Microsoft.

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FAIL

Moonlight, what a joke.

I have this piece of crap installed on my Ubuntu laptop for over 1 year and it simply does not work!

I have always kept it upgraded to the latest version to find that only 25% of silverlight "enriched" websites work fully.

If Microsoft want this to be a viable cross-platform technology then they should commit to developing the Linux version themselves. Or even better, Microsoft should realise that most professional web developers would prefer them to start implementing SVG and HTML5 into their crappy web browser.

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Flame

Media player ?

Silverlight can play media, it is not simply a media player however.

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Stop

@brudinie

MS dont want Silverlight to be a viable cross-platform technology, its part of their strategy to tie you to Windows. Wait a bit and you'll be getting "Moonlight shows that Open Source does not work" press releases from MS, press releases that say that the only full Silverlight experience can be gained from using Windows.

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FAIL

RE: Moonlight, what a joke

"Microsoft should realise that most professional web developers would prefer them to start implementing SVG and HTML5"

Really? Really?

Where's your evidence for this? Most professional web developers are quite happy with their flash and/or css. I personally despise flash, but thats mainly because of the abusive flash adverts out there.

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Gates Horns

A wager

50 quid says this still wont let skyplayer work on *NIX.

100 quid says I spend 5-6 hours trying to get it to work.

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FAIL

@Matt 5

I'm a professional web developer and I have friends working in the industry.

I have seen an enormous increase in web developers taking W3C standards importantly and understanding the importance of platform neutrality- especially with the public take-up of smart phones (many of which do not have Flash).

I have seen Flash only sites being replaced by xhtml / css / js driven sites.

Flash is more of a site enhancement tool now than a platform for delivering the entire web page.

Oh, BTW - You are NOT a web developer if you spend most of your time developing Flash or Silverlight sites. You are a Flash or Silverlight developer.

Only W3C technologies are WEB technologies as they follow the ideology of the web as set out by Sir Tim.

Flash and Silverlight are more like RIA technologies.

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FAIL

Silverlight should go away, and take Moonlight with it

I still haven't seen a single non-Windows machine with Silverlight installed, and then those only had it because it was somehow pushed with the updates. I've never tried it (I met maybe 3 or 4 sites using it) and I'm certainly not about to pollute my machine with this crap which probably doesn't even work outside of the few test cases on the dev site (as usual).

I've seen very few non-US sites using this thing and there doesn't seem to be that many in the US either. And hopefully we'll eventually be rid of those crappy add-ons with HTML5 (crossing fingers). They're not indexable, not bookmarkable and make a mess of content. Thankfully most clueless web agencies have stopped using them site-wide (except for the "artsy" types, by far the worst of the lot to work with).

This crud should just die a quick death. It's pitiful how bad it is.

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