Feeds

back to article Cost of seconding workers to the UK could soar

The cost of seconding employees from overseas could rise by almost 25% when tax changes are made next year, an expert has warned. Though planning could reduce the exposure, employers will face increased wage bills, he said. Tax changes affecting all UK employees will hit firms which second workers hard, because they are often …

COMMENTS

This topic is closed for new posts.
Thumb Down

Genius

This sounds like just the sort of fuckwitted arsefoolery you would expect from this governement. It sounds like these people already pay tax, we're just trying to extract more.

Errr..... wont it just happen less as a result? Net effect kick out foreigners who actually contribute whilst still allowing underpaid non tax paying fruitpickers who could quite happily be source from our own 'unwilling to work' benefits claimants.

I salute your intelligence, nulabour. Mindless morons.

0
0
Anonymous Coward

Nuts

These employees are paid penuts. What's the tax on peanuts ... shells?

0
0

Re: Genius

Just sounds like they are closing a tax loophole if you ask me.

>> Errr..... wont it just happen less as a result? Net effect kick out foreigners who actually contribute whilst still allowing underpaid non tax paying fruitpickers who could quite happily be source from our own 'unwilling to work' benefits claimants.

You think we need more non-doms earning £100,000s and fewer seasonal minimum wage fruit pickers?

0
0

Tax rises all round

"You think we need more non-doms earning £100,000s and fewer seasonal minimum wage fruit pickers?"

The top 1% of earners pay 25% of all income tax. If you make these people go away then the rest of us have to pay more tax to make up the shortfall. Quite frankly, I don't want them to go, so I think you should have to make up the shortfall on your own.

0
0
Gold badge

@Kay Tie

Er, the key bit you seem to have missed in there is "non-doms". This is short for "non-domiciled for tax purposes" and, as you might expect from this, means that it's a cheesy way of weaseling out of paying tax.

They may be in the top 1% of earners, but they're not contributing much to that 25%.

Incidently, for sheer entertainment value, when the Daily Heil holds forth on the subject of spongers not paying tax, remember that their proprietor is non-domiciled for tax purposes.

0
0

services

What if instead of the borrowing company paying the salary. The secondee is still saleried at the lending company. The borrowing company then payes a service fee to the lending company to have a specific task carried out. It just so happens that the person needs to be on site.

At the moment don't contractors get 1-2 years before they count as working in that country. At least when I went Dublin to install a system that was the case.

0
0
Anonymous Coward

MEPs

So, what about all those MEPs whose place of work is Brussels/Strasbourg, but who still officially live in the UK? Don't they count as seconded? Maybe the French/Belgians could try a similar scheme?

0
0
Pirate

"Tax loopholes"

As far as I can see, the current government definition of a "tax loophole" is what we used to call "disposable income".

0
0
Thumb Up

Where will it end?????

Next thing you know, Stressco will be paying their shelf stackers in frozen chickens and spuds, without paying the VAT.........(actually, that's not a bad idea...:-).)

0
0
Silver badge

@Michael 28

They'll have to pay the tax, but they'll just put an extra frozen chicken in a cardboard box in the warehouse every so often and ship the box to HMRC when it gets full.

0
0
Pint

25% tax top-up is about right

The £ lost about 25% in value last year.

Not that anyone in IT need be hit. Several loopholes which are standard practice are mentioned above, and any donkey work can be done offshore.

0
0
Anonymous Coward

If everyone stopped paying tax

then there would be a lot more money in the economy and those in free enterprise would have a much better standard of living.

It would also put an end to government corruption, they just wouldn't have any money to be corrupt with. It is a win win zero taxation, better standard of living and no corruption.

0
0
Anonymous Coward

Non-Domiciled

Can somoene explain how you become domiciled in the UK? Last time I checked you needed a court verdict to say you were (or not), and the guidelines for the decision are vague.

0
0
Bronze badge

@Jon52

The Irish have now come up with the same solution that the Netherlands used for a while....anyone employed 'in country' for more than 180 days in a taxt year is liable for local Income Tax etc.

I understand that the Netherlands gave it up due to most people finding loopholes and those that couldn't leaving the country giving a net reduction in received tax

0
0
This topic is closed for new posts.