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back to article Apollo 11 - The Owners' Workshop Manual

DIY vehicle maintenance publisher par excellence Haynes has agreeably decided to mark the forthcoming 40th anniversary of the first Moon landing by releasing a commemorative Apollo 11 Owners' Workshop Manual. The Haynes Apollo owners' workshop manual Of course, the book doesn't actually invite you to wander down to the National …

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Alien

WANT!

I was 8 years old and allowed to stay up late and watch! It made me (of course) want to be an astronaut, although the closest I ever got was doing a degree in Astrophysics and getting drunk with Patrick Moore...

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After reading this manual...

I liked the clear and concise instructions on lowering the Unit from a warehouse ceiling to the floor without having the guy ropes show on cheap video film.

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Happy

Indeed

But has it been based on a 'Complete strip down and re-build'?

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Coat

Oh cool...

I still have my Haynes Manual for my old '68 Beetle somewhere. Long after I gave the car away (why? why? why did I DO that?) I still get a nostalgic lift from the oily photos and exploded diagrams...

Never had an Apollo 11 lunar module, but I imagine people who do will enjoy this...

The airtight one at the back there. With the helmet.

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cool idea

pity they made it into a pamphlet

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Joke

It's a fake!

That's just a picture that looks like a Haynes manual with a Lunar Lander on it! If you hold it sideways and squint, you can see the pixel effects where the inconsistant images were stiched together and I won't even go into the obvious errors in the lighting effects.

There is no real manual and there never was, you read it here first. Any actual manuals you may see on the bookshelves in Halfords are a product of Orbital Mind Control lasers trained on you by the CIA......

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Paris Hilton

Me Want

That is all.

Fair cop, this posting was just an excuse to say Paris - because she knows about re-entry procedures.

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Bronze badge

Ascent Propulsion system

Had no maintenance requirements - it couldn't even be tested, the first firing for each ascent rocket was on/near the moon (think 10 and 13)

The propellants were so corrosive that they basically destroyed the rocket bell when fired - one shot rockets don't have much call for maintenance...

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Rocket science

So the 5 spanner jobs really are rocket science...

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Alien

Returning to Earth

is a reverse of the above procedure.

(The silver all-in-one with the CB radio and nappy)

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Happy

Haynes Manual

I remember the blurb on the back of them used to say "For the car owner who's not afraid to pick up a spanner and dismantle it". Images of a monkey wrench in pieces...

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One Sunday morning...

"Just taking it for a test run round the Earth dear - back later. What's that? Oh. 'Get some cheese'. Very funny."

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Coat

40 years ago!

Damn, this makes me feel old. I remember sitting up with my grandparents to watch it take place. 40 years ago though - by now we should be having the first Mars landings.

On an aside, I note that el Reg is changing our names - I am not a number so I've chnaged the handle. Did you you announce that you were doing this guys, because I don't remeber seeing anything about it. (But then at my advanced age, I may well have missed it)

Mines the one with large backpack and helmet

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Unhappy

Bah, why not do something useful instead...

...like write up an owner's workshop manual for my Lexus IS200, instead of pissing around playing spacemen.

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Anonymous Coward

Brilliant idea

Probably easier for the owner to service than the modern locked down car :(

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Anonymous Coward

Just what the DIY Moon explororer needed

Bravo Haynes!

Remember those cold drizzly Sunday afternoons in October, racing against fading light to loosen some rusted up bolts on a Mark 2 Cortina or similar.

By comparison fixing your Apollo 11 will be a doddle - no rain, no rust, 2 weeks unbroken daylight.

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Reassembly is not the reverse of disassembly

Given that most of the lander is still in situ on the Moon, and most of the rocket burned up in the athmosphere, it would appear that this is the one Haynes manual where reassembly is not the reverse of disassembly.

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Standing on the shoulders of giants...

When it was all fields around here I watched the Apollo 11 mission on a black and white telly at my primary school in Kampala. I know we've got the interwebs and mobiles phones and what not now, but back then I really thought that we'd be zooming around in hover cars and going on our hols to Mars by now.

What happened?

I still reckon that those guys from the Apollo missions and even the new guys and gals fixing the Hubble have balls of steel. I know nobody in IT who isn't in awe of the planning and execution of their remote IT support.

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Alien

That brings back memories!

Of course, I decided then and there to become an astronaut (ultimately studied astronomy, just three letters off)

We need a saturn 5 or LEM icon!!

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Coat

No debate about who got this one?

Lester's the obvious choice, though I doubt he gets a cut of the royalties...

// mine's the one with the grease stains

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Happy

re: Reassembly is not the reverse of disassembly

>"Given that most of the lander is still in situ on the Moon, and most of the rocket burned up in the athmosphere, it would appear that this is the one Haynes manual where reassembly is not the reverse of disassembly."

Reassembly is still the reverse of disassembly, it's just that unlike most Haines manuals the procedure in this one /starts/ with the reassembly and /ends/ with the disassembly.... and then you leave it disassembled forever.

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Joke

@ac 14:09

Cause these are more popular and cheaper to run

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Stop

Does this mean...

...that I could go to the scrappy to get the parts and make myself a lunar lander?

Mission aborted due to the landrover engine I got just fell to bits.

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Rob
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Happy

You think that's good

For all prospective first time dads out there, you should get the Haynes Baby manual, almost has a strip down section on pushchairs.

(Just don't read the sections about what can go wrong, like all other materials on this subject they can put the fear of a deity into you).

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Gaffer tape

No spanners, but they did have a roll of Duck tape / duct tape / gaffer tape. Very useful in 13, when they had to bodge the carbon dioxode scrubbers, and in 15 / 16/ 17? when they had to bodge up a new "mudguard" on the rover.

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Coat

No mention

about femail astronauts dropping spanners then?

(Mine's the one covered in moon dust)

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Linux

Why did it have to be Haynes

I hate the Haynes manuals! They always seem to assume that you know some part of the procedure that I just don't know. That and they usually cover such a broad range of associated cars that they border on useless.

Now if Chiltons or Bentley Publishers put it out I would fly directly to the shop to pick up a copy.

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Spitfire and Lancaster Hayes manuals anybody?

Was impressed to see Hayes manuals for the Spitfire and Lancaster!

"It is the book DIY fanatics wanting to service their own World War II Spitfire have been waiting for" Western Daily Press

Awesome!

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@BoldMan

Are you Brian May? If so, say hi to your son. He stayed in halls with me at uni and wasn't anywhere near as good as you on the guitar.

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Haynes on ....

Both the Haynes and Chiltons books drive me nuts. For example my car had significant drivetrain change while still in the same body style. 1993 to 2003 is one body. 1998 through 2003 has a new drivetrain. The books don't mention that and go on the idea that they're same.

Some things read simply. Steps 1 through 5 indicate taking a few things apart. Should be a piece of cake, they are a total of 5 lines. Nope. Item 3 is a 6 hour process where they haven't documented what has to be done to accomplish it.

Sometimes they're simply off. For example, change the fuel pump. It's in the fuel tank. Remove the exhaust, loosen a few bolts, and detach the tank. No problem. They forgot to mention raising the car high in the air, and disconnecting the entire rear suspension, rear wheels, and setting the axle on the ground. That was the only way to get enough clearance to do it. Option #2 found online is easier. Cut a hatch in the trunk (boot), swap the pump, and seal it up. The first option is an all-day project. The second option took about 20 minutes.

Thankfully, the Apollo 11 book won't be used by anyone in a pinch. :)

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A must buy....

...although I don't think I am ever going to be present at a Saturn V launch now which is one of my few ambitions. Apparently it makes a shuttle launch look tame, even if the thrust levels are similar. Something to do with the low frequency vibration from the pumps in the S-1B.

Anyone else remember James Burke's explanation of craters on the moon where he poured different colour (even on 405 line B&W TV!!) sand into a tray in layers and then bunged in a big stone with the result that he had a crater that looked exactly like many on the moon?

The moon landings are still our species' most impressive achievement (listen conspiracy theorists, we went there OK?), and all done with computing power that these days would run your fridge or washing machine. There really were some engineers with vision then....

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Coat

amazing

40 years ago they flew in a bucket of assorted nuts and bolts to the moon. With a program memory of 4K...

39 yearts ago they started developing the space shuttle. those computers had a whopping 16k ...

Fast forward to 2009. Modern programmers can't even write a friggin bootloader that is smaller than a couple of hundred K anymore ... The os takes 20 seconds to boot at 3 GHz and is full of security holes, inconsistencies and goes tits up if a fly sneezes in the vicinity.

Those machines ran with 4K ram, were fully multitasking and hade ZERO security holes or bugs. ( and they were wirewrapped ). Boot time was inexistent. Apply power and 2 clockticks later it was ready to run.

I can't shake the notion humankind is actually devolving....

Mine's the white one with the Eagle mission patch on the left shoulder and all the plumbing holes in the front. Oh and the helmet with golden visor is mine too

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Unhappy

It's all your fault!

Now look what you've made me do! I've gone and spent $160 bucks on cool Haynes books. Is this your clever scheme for saving the economy?

@Robert Moore:

You do know that Chilton's is still a Hayne's imprint, right? Doh!

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Thanks Reg!

Father's day is now sorted.

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Coat

@ John Robson

But had they possessed this manual back in the day, they would have known how to replace the corroded rocket bell, no?

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Anonymous Coward

You could just save your money

and get the proper info straight from the source:

http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19770078690_1977078690.pdf (11.5MB pdf)

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Coat

So, who wants to bet...

...that a certain Wallace will be first in line for a copy? The "right trousers", at last!

Uhh, yeah...the big heavy white one with the Stars'n'Strips on the shoulder, thanks.

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Paris Hilton

Very nice but

you'll never get your rebuild to pass today's emissions tests.

Yes, another excuse for a Paris gag...

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RESpitfire and Lancaster Hayes manuals anybody?

Haynes also do a spitfire DVD :)

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Alien

@vincent himpe

>Those machines ran with 4K ram, were fully multitasking and hade ZERO security holes or bugs. ( and they were wirewrapped ). Boot time was inexistent. Apply power and 2 clockticks later it was ready to run.

Erm ... didn't they get numerous 1202 Program Alarms.on approaching the surface causing Armstrong to put the Lander down manually ?

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What about the memory

Is there a full wiring guide to the rope memory?

Now that would be a big book

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Unhappy

Amazing ?

1201 alarm.

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Heart

Astoudingly useless

but amazingly cool. I'd buy one and keep it with the rest of my stupid but interesting toys

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Low "surface" miles, one owner.

Available for pickup. A decent stage, with optional excursion vehicle. Stored in "pristine" environment .

Could be considered a "parts" vehicle. A couple are available, see used vehicle lot.

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Coat

Re Gaffer tape.

Yes, but if the 13 astronauts had had the Haynes manual, they'd have turned to the page and read:

"Insert the new CM cartridges into the LEM scrubbers. Use NASA service tool RG-37X99487b to adapt the cartridges to fit."

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Ropes and Bells

@Tony Humphreys

"Is there a full wiring guide to the rope memory?"

Go find a book called "Digital Apollo" - it has a section on the rope memory, programming and assembly.

@John Robson

"The propellants were so corrosive that they basically destroyed the rocket bell when fired"

It had nothing to do with the corrosiveness of the propellants. The engine bell of the LM engines had an ablative internal coating to protect them from the heat/force of the combustion which was designed to burn away during engine firing. The same principle applied to the re-entry heat shield of the Command Module.

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@Robert Moore

"I hate the Haynes manuals! They always seem to assume that you know some part of the procedure that I just don't know. That and they usually cover such a broad range of associated cars that they border on useless."

Or perhaps it's that you border on useless. I've never had a problem with Haynes, Auto data or even those dodgy translations from the Japanese found in some factory workshop manuals particularly during the sixties and seventies. *

Cars generally are big complicated machines made up of lots of small simple things. Remember that and you won't go far wrong.

* Remember to always "Avoid entanglement of dog with wheel spokes"

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10 points!!!

Bloody excellent idea, Haynes. One to remember. I'll buy.

Actually, another to remember is the day my mate and I were under his Morris Marina, whipping out the gearbox to change the synchro rings. Should've used 'precision' tools but we got by with a few spanners, etc. from Halfords. Thanks to Haynes, we did it! Ran for years after, but of course with a Morris Marina, you'd wish it didn't.

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Joke

Avoid entanglement with a dog in wheel spokes??

Nothing!

We've killer squirrels here in Finland.

(www.hs.fi) <<A squirrel scampered into the bicycle wheel of an unlucky Finnish opera singer, causing him to fall, knock himself out and break his nose just ahead of the world premiere of a new opera.

Esa Ruuttunen was pedalling his way to the Helsinki Opera House last month when the squirrel ran into his spokes.

The singer ended up concussed and in a local hospital, rather than at his rehearsals for the Finnish opera Kaarmeen hetki (Hour of the Serpent), which opens on September 15.

"He is not yet singing in rehearsals, but thinks he will be able to perform at the world premiere," Finnish National Opera spokeswoman Heidi Almi told Reuters.

The squirrel died in the accident.>>

(What that's got to do with Apollo-11 or IT beats the fuc*k outta me, but it probably won't get moderated until Friday, so that's OK.)

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Boffin

@ Vincent and David

Not only did they have errors come from the guidance computer on landing, but the meaning of those errors wasn't actually documented anywhere. So the guys running the mission made the "command decision" that if the errors came less often than twice a minute, they'd carry on.

To summarise: The hardware engineers were so pushed for time that prototype hardware ended up becoming the production version. The software engineers wrote code with major bugs in it, and failed to write any relevant documentation. The end customer found one of those bugs at the worst possible time for everyone. And the managers made a random decision with no basis in engineering knowledge.

So it's nothing at all like engineering today. Oh wait...

And FWIW Vincent, you might want to compare oranges with oranges. Say, compare a car ABS system with the Apollo guidance software. Embedded software has a massive raft of experience in making sure "Error 1201" doesn't happen on your car's ABS (or defibrillator, or other safety-related kit). Trouble is that it's expensive, and you get what you pay for.

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