back to article Boffins build 'intimate contact' cathode for e-car 'super' batteries

Scientists from Canada's University of Waterloo have developed what they claim is a crucial step forward in the creation of lithium-sulphur rechargeable batteries. A team led by Professor Linda Nazar have created a cathode capable of sustaining a reversible electrochemical reaction at high current rates. Lithium-sulphur is seen …

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Anonymous Coward

a title

'lithium-sulphur batteries are less volatile than li-ions'

Less volatile? when containing 10x the potential? somehow me thinks not.. I suspect that the more energy involved in a battery only ever increases the Potential (yes pun intended) for a massive short to explosivly release all that energy...

haven't we seen 'mesporous carbon' recently in another battery technology?? [STAIR]

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Boffin

Cool

Petrolheads won't have anything to whinge about soon..

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Flame

Who remembers sodium-sulphur?

Sodium-sulphur was going to be the next big thing once upon a time (late 1970s early 1980s).

Are Lithium and sodium in similar places in the periodic table? Are there any other similarities between sodium-sulphur and lithium-sulphur? Where is sodium-sulphur technology now?

Flames, because I know a bit about sodium-sulphur batteries.

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Unhappy

@Martin Lyne

Sigh....I guess we'll have to listen to the battery-heads whinge until then

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Boffin

Re: Who remembers sodium-sulphur?

I think you're referring to Molten Salt batteries.... Maybe.

They are quite wisely used in certain fields, and are extremely effective, unfortunately they (currently) only work at very high temperatures, so are unsuitable as the primary energy source for an EV.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Molten_salt_battery

Maybe in the future - but way off for the time being.

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Dead Vulture

"unstable as the primary source for an EV"

"I think you're referring to Molten Salt batteries.... Maybe."

Couldn't tell definitively from the Wikistuff but it sounded plausible.

"unstable as the primary source for an EV"

Well, maybe that's why Lucas Chloride Electric Vehicles (where I know the sodium-sulphur thing from) and Chloride Silent Power (also in the late 70s/early 80s) are now dim and distant memories.

Mind you if Lucas management had listened to the Lucas Aersospace Shop Stewards Combine during that era, Lucas might have become world leaders in hybrid drivetrain technology. They didn't listen, and although hybrid vehicles are now seen around the world, Lucas are a thing of the past. Their Quaker forefathers wouldn't be pleased.

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