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back to article IBM fires WebSphere CloudBurst at McKinsey heretics

When consultant McKinsey & Co recently warned that cloud computing would cost you money rather help you than save it, IBM took the unusual step of responding. IBM wasn't the company singled out in the report - it was Amazon's fluffy Web Services. But IBM is working with Amazon to make its software available through the Elastic …

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"IBM was clearly rattled."

I'm not surprised. Upper-middle IBM manglement is still stuck in the '50s & '60s.

Centralized computing is no longer a valid business model. Get over it.

That said, IMO and in general, McKinsey can usually be safely ignored.

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Ibm fires

IBM Is now promotion best service to the public. I know they doing this from last many years. But in todays days they are bringing lots of many IT product in the market.

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RE: "IBM was clearly rattled."

"Centralized computing is no longer a valid business model. Get over it."

Another uninformed comment. Cloud computing, which IBM actually invented back in the 50's and 60's under another name, IS centralized computing -- just not necessarily in your center. Most of what we're hearing about cloud computing is nothing more than maketing hype to push cobbled together version of existing solutions.. What most people consider "new and improved" today is really little more than a revisit of past, proven solutions. Cloud, virtulaization, automated provisioning, etc., etc., are all well established mainframe functionalities that have been with us for decades. They're only new to those who got into this business in the days of client-server and afterward.

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@Dan JOhnson

"Another uninformed comment."

I doubt it :-)

"Cloud computing, which IBM actually invented back in the 50's and 60's under another name, IS centralized computing"

Duh. That's why I used the phrase. Trust me, Mr. JOhnson, I was probably speaking SNA before you were out of three cornered pants. I own functional examples of IBM 1401 and System/360-20 computers, and an IBM 650 that I'm in the process of restoring (I also have functional examples of a Honeywell 316, a Burroughs B2000, and the next project, an Amdahl 470 V5, if I ever get all the parts together). I understand mainframes. I know what they are, and what they are good at.

That said, the business model of the mainframe shop is a dinosaur. YES, there are places where centralized computing makes sense. But for the vast majority of home users and small businesses? Nope. Costs too much, and adds over-all complexity to the situation, neither of which are positives. And for medium to big businesses, it makes sense to keep it all in-house for many more reasons, starting with security.

Today's "cloud computing" is more about marketing droids separating fools from their money than it is about anything else. IMO, anyway.

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