back to article Boffins monitor strato-weather from half-mile underground

Ever since there have been weather people, aviators and sailors have taunted them for failing to simply step outside - or go to the window - and look at the sky. But now meteorology boffins have struck back, saying that actually one of the best places to monitor weather conditions is a disused mine tunnel half a mile underground …

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M7S
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Black Helicopters

Is there something they are not telling us?

Or have they just been watching their old VHS copy of Slipstream and have become a bit wary?

Icon because they read the yellow descriptor box.

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Old, tired, myth

*yawn*

"‘Cosmoclimatology’ - tired old arguments in new clothes": http://www.realclimate.org/index.php/archives/2007/03/cosmoclimatology-tired-old-arguments-in-new-clothes/

Plenty more: http://www.google.co.uk/search?hl=en&q=cosmic%20rays%20site%3Arealclimate.org&meta=

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Boffin

To many kooks...

"Is there something they are not telling us?"

There is a lot they don't know they can't tell us.

I collect such ideas and run them against my own concepts and some of them are very good indeed. The team are limited in what they can speculate on until they come to conclusions so they didn't mention microwaves -or at least I didn't see it in your article.

http://my.opera.com/Weatherlawyer/blog/2008/12/20/earthquakes

Sound is made when different layers of air slide over each other. There is no way that one stream can stir another. Try getting a tea leaf to move around in a cup of tea. That's with a relatively sticky perfect liquid. Gas is less viscous and more easily compressed.

Once you realise that, then conventional understanding is stood on its head and bumped loudly.

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Silver badge

"Sound is made when different layers of air slide over each other"

Uh, that's not how my physics professor explained it to me. Sound is made when a source sets a vibration in the surrounding air - vibration that propagates through collision of particles. There is no air "sliding over", it's molecules smashing into each other that does it.

So, can we have a physics professor to settle this ?

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Ru
Boffin

Re: Old Tired Myth

Uh, read the article. To quote: "This isn't because the cosmic rays are affecting the atmosphere". Using cosmic ray measurements to gather information about the state of the atmosphere is quite different to claiming that they affect it in serious ways.

Enough with the unrelated knee-jerk debunkings.

Oh, and that weatherlawyer thing is impressively incoherent.

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