Feeds

back to article NASA's lost toolbag filmed from Earth

The tool bag lost by NASA astronaut Heide Stefanyshyn-Piper during an ISS space walk has been filmed sailing over Earth by a veteran satellite observer over the weekend. SpaceWeather.com has a video recording of the backpack-sized bag's extended lesson in basic Newtonian physics made by Kevin Fetter from his backyard observatory …

COMMENTS

This topic is closed for new posts.

September 18th?

Shouldn't that be the 18th of November?

0
0
Coat

Tie me 'roo down

"[…] make sure everything is tried down on their remaining spacewalks."

I'd say they're trying them _up_ there in orbit...

But honestly, I'd completely hate to know how much junk we currently have drifting in orbit endangering both current and future space missions.

Mine's the one with "My buddy went to the ISS and all I got was this lousy grease-stained jacket" across the back.

0
0

This post has been deleted by a moderator

How much?

.."bag and contents cost about $100,000..." and I though B&Q were pricey.

0
0
Alert

sick of this

How can this darn drop still be an issue? They lost a darn 100k bag, so what? Shit happens. Each and every launch costs about as much as it would take to end hunger in Africa (feel free to replace with shame of your choice). People DIE exploring space. I remember when people cared about the whole thing, and not only when another shuttle goes down. If all the excitement NASA can generate these days comes from someone dropping a greasy bag o' bolts, something is very wrong.

0
0
Alien

The handbag has landed

One small tool-bag for women, one giant hold-all for womankind.

* Apologies to Mr Armstrong

0
0
Joke

That is never a grease gun

I looked at the video, that's never a grease gun unless there's some new euphemism I'm not yet aware of. I can only assume one of the female astronauts took one look at her male colleagues and added the useful little implement to the - ahem - Tool kit.

0
0
Coat

If it hits someone...

doesn't that mean they'll die from a tool from space?

0
0
Thumb Up

@Vacuum.Head

Not to worry; I was using hyperbole. As an old space buff, I _do_ know approximately how much debris we _know_ to have cluttering our skies... though that does not stop me from wishing I didn't. Thanks for the links!

0
0
Silver badge
Coat

Spacetravel is just like living on Earth

The builders still haven't finished your dream home. You call for a plumber, takes ages to arrive, and still can't fix the problem. Someone goes out for a walk and looses their bag. The local buses are clapped out, about to be junked, but there's no plans to buy new ones. I'm only surprised that the bag didn't also contain a laptop with NASA's entire staff details...

Mine's the one with the Shuttle Annual Pass in the pocket.

0
0
Silver badge
Coat

@Vacuum.Head

Your information is incomplete and insufficient to allow us to locate the object in question. We also need to know the RA, Dec. and precession velocity of the ascending node, as well as the time of separation and the RA and Dec. of the ISS at that time, in order to be able to track it. :)

Mine's the grease-stained one with the much thumbed ephemeris in the pocket, ta...

0
0
Joke

Insert...

...joke about the Star-Mangled Spanner here.

0
0

Magnitude 8

The magnitude measure of stars originate with the ancient Greeks, which had magnitude 1 as the brightest stars in the sky and magnitude 6 as the faintest visible with the naked eye on a clear night. Assuming equal relative decrease in brightness, an increase of 1 in magnitude roughly halves the brightness. Modern magnitudes are defined so a magnitude 6 start is 1/100th the brightness of a magnitude 1 star, which makes the decrease in brightness roughly by 2.5 per step. Also, the brightest stars may now have negative magnitude (Sirius has magnitude about -1.5).

A magnitude 8 object is about as bright as Neptune, which you do need a telescope to see.

0
0
Joke

I'm not impressed

with the piss poor performance on this Shuttle Mission

0
0

What would the dormouse have said?

Twinkle, twinkle little toolkit

In a fast decaying orbit.

As you fall to earth below

Please don't land upon my toe.

0
0
Boffin

"We'll just assume that means it was pretty."

Magnitude is a measure of brightness. It means it would be invisible to the naked eye even under perfect viewing conditions. The larger the magnitude, the fainter the object.

0
0
NB
Paris Hilton

surely..

That little ditty would sound better as:

twinkle twinkle little tote,

How long, I wonder, will you float?

the original is just terse and fits no discernible rhyme scheme.

Paris, cos she can hold my tool anyday.

0
0

Spinoff ?

I thought Velcro was invented for just this eventuality - or were those stories about Teflon etc. just hype to justify the space-race ?

0
0

"make sure everything is tried down"

tried down where exactly?

0
0

@Allan Rutland

...or a star-mangled spanner...

(Apologies to Arthur C. Clarke)

0
0
Paris Hilton

And that's why...

...you never let a woman borrow your tools.

"Honey, have you seen my toolbag?"

"Have you tried looking in lower orbit?"

Paris, cause that's one tool i'd love to have pictures of burning up on re-entry

0
0
Coat

Falling to toolbag to be followed

Shortly by falling stoolbag, so I hear.

// mine is Gordon's

0
0
Pirate

"NO TOOLS LEFT IN VEHICLE"

Even that's arguable. :)

0
0

US Navy to think of the children

The USN could make short shrift of shooting this bag of bits to (whacky jacqui) smithereens - just as soon as the right fule moon comes along.

So, who's it to be?

0
0
Alert

wouldn't it be great...

If the shuttle were to retrieve the toolbag once it has departed from the ISS?

Surely some unscheduled canada arm work would be a good exercise...

afterall they dont shut the cargo bay until re-entry...

mind you, just because the toolbag cost 100K doesn't mean its worth it!

0
0
Anonymous Coward

Anybody care to place a wager

as to how long it takes for someone to use this toolkit as a handy deus ex machina in a two-bit SF offering?

0
0
Sam

How Much??

"$100,000"

So what exactly was wrong with fucking Screwfix??

0
0

deus non machina ex

"Anybody care to place a wager {By Anonymous Coward Posted Tuesday 25th November 2008 21:28 GMT} as to how long it takes for someone to use this toolkit as a handy deus ex machina in a two-bit SF offering?"

You're late for that one... that entire theme has already been used by R.A. Heinlein, Norbert Dillich, Isaac Asimov, Robert Silverberg, and a whole load of others in the mid-50s, and some others since then.

Sorry... not really an original theme. Try Kurt Vonnegut for a pretty unique take on the general idea.

0
0
Silver badge
Boffin

@Torben Mogensen

So what's the magnitude of the brightest star in the sky, you know, the one called "Sol"?

0
0
This topic is closed for new posts.