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back to article Indian chief exec murder 'a warning for management'

India's Minister of Labour and Employment has landed himself in hot water by describing the death earlier this week of the chief executive of Graziano Transmissioni India as "a warning for management”. Lalit Choudhary, 47, died on Monday of head wounds after being attacked by a mob at the Graziano Transmissioni car parts factory …

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Flame

Teabreak's over, back on your heads

How long before we have similar riots over here again? Remember the level of dissatisfaction over the Poll Tax that led to those riots? What will happen when the "unwashed masses" finally realise that things are not going to get better for the British economy any time soon - especially with Gordon "WE WON'T INCREASE (income) TAXES" Brown in charge, and that the nation as a whole is now a hell of a lot worse off than we were under Thatcher's government? (Except for Big Business, that is - and I thought Labour was supposed to protect the Working Man, not shareholder profits and ministerial gravy trains?)

How many more ill-conceived "laws" and poorly-concealed 'stealth' taxes can they inflict before the British public realise they are not as concerned with "saving the environment" or "protecting the people" as they are with living high on the hog while they fiddle, and our economy goes up in flames faster than ancient Rome (allegedly) did under Nero.

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Alert

wow!

makes you wish it happened more over in EU/USA

that would sharpen up all those middle management twits!

U-screw-up u get lynched.

hmmmm i feel a BOFH moment coming on... :)

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he said what?

Rajeev Chandrasekhar [..] said: “[...] I am frankly flabbergasted. [...]”

Did he? Did he really? Either there's a translator somewhere who is being flowery with his translations, or Rajeev went to school in England. I wonder which...

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Stop

assault != battery

> When Lalit tried to pacify them, they assaulted him with rods."

If they had only assaulted him, he'd probably still be alive.

Who writes this drek?

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Thumb Up

Business to Politics

heh, I'd advocate adopting similar "business realtions" between the government and it's electorate.

In fact with most government policies, they need to be tested/tried on themselves first, after all, they are the most important assembly in the land!

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Dead Vulture

Why were they shocked?

Surely it's common sense:

If you push people until they respond extremely, don't be surprised if they respond extremely.

and the corollary: don't push people to the point where they respond extremely.

Now this has nothing to do with who is at "fault" or who is to "blame" it's just how to stay alive.

Play the game - or not - but just watch how you treat people; and if you have to, stop playing.

Tombstone for the poor dead chaps peers who don't want to hear the warning he never had.

Sam

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Hail to the king

At least overpaid American multinational executives are thinking ahead and have got puppet er president and chief to bring in the 1st BCT (Brigade Combat Team) in case Uncle Sam's peasants get any ideas.

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Bronze badge

He won't last

That government official won't last long. Can't have government ministers telling it like it is after all. They need to sugar coat or preferably completely twist things around first. I guess the "business community" in the area can't handle the idea that perhaps they've pushed people too far?

It seems "profits before people" has the nasty habit of putting those who make the profits the first up against the wall when the people start the revolution.

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Happy

Indian English

@caffeine addict: Yes, he almost certainly did say "frankly flabbergasted". English is taught well in India, as far as I can tell, with the result that most educated Indians use colloquialisms like this in normal conversation. The difference, you might find, is that sometimes the language can see a little dated - a kind of mixture of 2008 and 1958. The Times of India is a great read, well written, with a delightfully quaint turn of phrase.

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Gaz
Paris Hilton

@By yeah, right

I should bloody well hope he doesn't. Sympathising with the workers' plight is one thing but effectively condoning murder when you're in a public office beggars belief. Wheres the justice in a mob battering someone to death with metal bars?

Paris because even she knows two wrongs don't make a right...

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Black Helicopters

@Eduard Coli

Exactly, couldn't have said it better myself.

Black helicopter and AC cos speaking out in dubya's 'Merica is getting to be increasingly dangerous.

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xjy
Paris Hilton

Start a book, anyone?

It would be fun to see the odds offered for various fat cats over here.

In Poland the workers have a tradition of carting unpopular bosses out of the factory in a wheelbarrow.

In Britain the last time this happened to any great extent (or threatened to happen) was after the war (sorry WW2), when all the demobbed cannon fodder were thoroughly pissed off at dying so much, chucked Churchill out on his fat drunken arse, and all knew how to use guns. So they pulled a "welfare plan" out of a liberal hat (they were the ones who designed it) and got the ever-helpful Labour hypocrites to push it through so they could be blamed when or if it fucked up. The deceit worked, and instead of nationalizing the land and big industry, we got crumbs off the banqueting table and 60 years of continued bloodsucking.

Think about it. Suddenly when things got hot, the arseholes didn't dare say they couldn't afford it or there was no money in the kitty, and Britain was a damn sight poorer then than it is today.

It's a tradition of the rich to kill the poor. Normally fairly indirectly by sickness or traffic accidents or drink or drugs or tobacco, but frequently by outright war - and not just on colonial semi-slaves. Churchill in Sidney Street, Pinkerton's thugs in the US, etc. When the workers or the poor turn out on pickets or demonstrations, who are the ones armed to the teeth and protected by all sorts of high-tech combat-wear?

Just a couple of thoughts.

(Paris, cos she'd make an entertaining wailing woman behind the coffins (XXL) of the various terminated fat cats...)

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Anonymous Coward

re: he said what?

Have a quick gander at some of the Indian press online and you'll see that 'flabbergasted' is pretty normal fare. Indians often use english words that have long since bitten the dust in general UK usage, and other words get used in often weird (to us) ways or contexts. 'Flowery' is one way to put it, but I find it quite endearing. Bus crashes that slaughter 20-30 people are often referred to as a "mishap", or an "incident"; varying levels of sexual assault/harassment are collectively called "eve-teasing" and police opening fire on protestors is optimistically known as a "firing". Starting at least one sentence with a slightly inappropriate and rahter Douglas Adamsesque "interestingly" seems to be de rigeur for journos. The President of India generally sends "felicitations" to the populace on important religious holidays.

And mobs beating the shit out of people that have pissed them off is not uncommon, although its usually drunken bus drivers or eve-teasers rather than chief execs. Clearly they're taking the enforcement of corporate responsibility very seriously these days.

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Gates Horns

Also in Sri Lanka

the tea industry workers not long ago , got pissed off with the starvation wages that they were paid and terminated some of the managers.

Did their wages improve? Have not heard any thing about that .

All change is by way of the gallows and the block apparently.

Wouldn't it be nice though if the wealthy could share a bit for the masses. unlikely though as the trend for the pay of CEO types is such that it is now around 250 times that of the average pay packet.

If I was younger and fitter I would help built the barricades but am now too clapped. What a bugger.

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@ Gaz

"effectively condoning murder when you're in a public office beggars belief"

It does, it does. Yet our lords & masters condone it every day...

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Pirate

Sometimes....

Sometimes companies make decisions that just can't be justified. Here in America we have a company that is closing a plant... they refuse to keep the plant open and they refuse to sell the plant. 600 workers losing their jobs, a small city is having to deal with 600 families losing their livelihood. An empty building becoming a source of blight within a small town.

Why? Who knows yet. Possibly wanting to sell the parts at a bit more money than if sold as a whole? To prevent a competitor in their market? For years employees and the city have been a source of income and profit for this company and now they are cast aside without so much as a backwards glance.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lJNIDjmEgmc

Was what they did right? Of course not.

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b
Alert

related:

Mob killing threatens India’s business appeal

http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/c5afb9fc-8beb-11dd-8a4c-0000779fd18c.html

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Stop

"and no dispute can be settled by murdering an adversary"

Erm, yes it can.

It may not be nice or "right", but I would say that murdering the opposition in an argument would be a pretty effective method of winning the dispute.

Who's left? The winner, that's who.

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Black Helicopters

Union busting was acceptable

Now India have turned that pony around with CEO busting.

Not happy with the death, but the minister WAS right. This IS a warning to CEO's et al.

And ministers say that about the terrorist bombings: they are a threat to ordinary citizens. 'cept for some reason that's not "frankly flabbergasting" when they use it there.

Hypocritical wankers. CEOs should get 2x average pay and shares to double that. Each and every worker works to make the business a success but the CEO is the one that gets most of the bonus. If he's so indispensable, why not do without any workers and see how productivity shoots up.

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