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back to article Intel adds cheap dual-core, quad-core chips

Intel has quietly updated its processor price list over the weekend, making a 45nm addition to its economy quad-cores, a new entry-level dual-core chip, and an upgrade to the Celeron D family. The tried-and-true Core 2 Quad Q6600 processor now has a similarly cheap alternative from Intel that's based on a 45nm fab. The new Core …

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Happy

oh ya

Waiting for that first quad core Celeron D!

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Paris Hilton

"Waiting for that first quad core Celeron D!"

4x's crappier than a single Celeron for twice the price! Oh joy.

Paris, cuz she knows Celerons blow, too.

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What to do with the rejects

I can't understand why when a chip is mass production price driven, they have such things as Celeron fabrication plants.

Or is it a generic name for chips that never quite made it out the door as first quality?

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Silver badge
Paris Hilton

My head hurts...

I remember the arguments against using cpu speed in the model number, but since it's all gone Ennnn and Qnnnn (where nnnn is a pseudo random number), I've completely lost the plot!

All I know is my two desktops are E6600 and Q6600, so the same core2, running at 2.4Ghz, just one machine has 2 cores, the other 4... Where all these new weird and wonderful models fit in around these old chips is a complete mystery to me!

It used to be that the bigger the number, the better the chip, but that doesn't seem to hold true anymore, especially with the seemingly random L2 cache amounts.

If you're not building machines 24/7, and look away from the CPU models for a month, I challenge anyone to know what the hell is going on!

As for AMD, I lost the plot on those just after the X2 range appeared!

If anyone has a simple way (i.e. fits on one page) of explaining these model numbers I'd be very interested in seeing it.

Paris, cos it makes her head hurt too.

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Coat

Marketing slogan idea?

"Four times the cores, four times the cache misses!"

/mine is the one with the pockets sewn shut

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@Steve Evans

"If anyone has a simple way (i.e. fits on one page) of explaining these model numbers I'd be very interested in seeing it."..

Me too...

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Paris Hilton

@Steve Evans as well.....

....thank God someone else doesn't understand it. I thought I was the only one unable to comprehend processor numbers. Since 1998 I have build a dozen computers for myself and friends. 6 months ago I was so confused I just bought one from Dell to save my head from spinning.

What I can't understand with this article is 2 things:

1. How Intel can still call a chip "Celeron". I don't see Ford calling a car the Model T in it's present manufactoring.

2. How many chips does it produce for an ordinary Computer? The list is endless.

KISS - keep it simple stupid

Paris - because we'll all like her KISS.

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What's ...

... the point of having the single-core Celeron D when you can have a dual-core Celeron E1xxx or Pentium (yet more crazy branding) E2xxx for about the same price? What am I missing here?

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JC

What you're missing

You're missing that these aren't OEM prices. OEMs get better deals on Celerons even though the % of total system cost is so low you won't typically want one unless they only offered the otherwise low-end bundle only with a Celeron and no opportunity to upgrade to a better processor.

I do suspect the Celeron name will absorb some of the other E2xxx and E4xxx soon, Intel does have too many product names at the moment.

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