back to article Worms spread via spam on Facebook and MySpace

Miscreants have created a pair of worms targeting MySpace and Facebook users. Two variants of a new worm - dubbed Koobface - are the first to use social engineering sites to press-gang infected machines into botnets, warns net security firm Kaspersky Lab. When a user with an infected machine accesses his MySpace account the …

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Dead Vulture

myspace

I had 2 examples of this in my myspace box... duly reported them as spam. The odd thing was you could not "delete or add" them as that link was missing from the layout of the msg. Anyway no harm done as i didnt click on the links and reported it as processed canned meat :)

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Paris Hilton

"Paris Hilton..."

All right who was it? Own up!

This is clearly the work of a Reg reader :D

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Paris Hilton

They deserve all they get!

/rantfromITsupport

Anyone on faceboot/myspace who opens these up deserve all they get. Please let it be a REAL virus for once that will jump host from PC to Human and kill off these idiots who allow these things to spread.

/endrantfromITsupport

Paris .. even she knows not to open dodgy links about herself.

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Anonymous Coward

Pretty precise prediction!

So, a guy from a anti-virus software company "...predicted that we'd see an increase in cybercriminals exploiting MySpace, Facebook and similar sites" and then "we're now seeing evidence of this".

I predict that someone will steal some office supplies here and get out earlier for a beer with the new intern. I'll let you know more about it on monday.

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Thumb Up

Social engineering sites

Whether that's deliberate or a Freudian slip, El Reg I salute you!

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Paris Hilton

worrying...

...that I read it as "Paris Hilton Tosses off Dwarf On The Street".

And catched!!! Ee gads man - caught!

Can we not get some semi-literate worm writers out there?

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Paris Hilton

Not just MySpace and Facebook

I've been getting emails with a link pointing at that file, with headlines such as

"Martian Soil Fantastic For Growing Weed Says Nasa"

and

"Paris Hilton Initially Denies Having Inverted Nipples"

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Anonymous Coward

Who'd be stupid enough to fall for all that?!

Ah wait, they're Facebook users.

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Silver badge
Flame

Yawn

Been getting these via "ordinary" e-mail as well. Subject is an unbelievable news headline, message encourages reader to view a video clip which turns out to be a malicious download.

The real question is, WHY would any web browser allow executable content to be downloaded and run? There is **never** an excuse for that behaviour. Running a program, especially a freshly-downloaded one, should **always** require a deliberate action on the part of the user.

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Gold badge
Happy

@Chris

Who'd be stupid enough? What, you mean apart from Guardian journalists*?

*El Reg article elsewhere today.

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Stop

Facebook - don't call me stupid

People, please don't call Facebook users stupid. And please don't say people are stupid for allowing these things to spread.

I am really, really careful about security on my PC and never accept dodgy messages, etc. However, this latest worm is very clever. I got a message from a friend's Facebook account. It was a standard message, the email address was the correct Facebook address and it was someone who was in my friend's list. The message just asked me if I would invite someone my friend knew to be my friend. I clicked on the link thinking it would take me to my friend's Facebook page so I could tell her that I didn't really want to invite this person as a friend and the link took me to someone's Facebook page which looked fairly normal except that it had loads of links on it. These links were clearly dodgy so I immediately came out of Facebook and reported it. I reported it two weeks later but have still not had a response from Facebook.

So, if you think you're invincible then go on, carry on calling people names. But when you get bitten, remember not to cry!

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