back to article Apple partially rehabilitates Sun's DTrace

Apple has decided that developers can use Sun Microsystems' DTrace tool to monitor applications under its Mac OS/X operating system after all. Well, sort of. Sun engineer and co-author of DTrace Adam Leventhal has revealed that a limitation built into the earlier version of Mac OS/X 10.5 that disabled DTrace for certain …

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Dead Vulture

"Mac OS/X"? Wut?

I'm sorry, I was under the impression I was reading an IT site...

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System problem fixed or not

Just examining what's been said:

Note that the [tempest in a teapot] that formed around Adam's findings was about not being able to examine DRM-handling applications such as iTunes.

Quoting your article:

"...that will help you profile and debug your code more effectively, and fine-tune your application's..."

Notice that Apple is saying "your code" and "your application's", the operative word being "your". Not Apple's.

Adam had an argument about the method of excising such applications chosen by Apple had affected some of the statistics/counters of the entire system.

So it sounds as though Apple has changed something...with all applications showing up. It's not clear about whether they addressed Adam's specific complaint.

About the complaints of many others chiming in on comments to Adam's post: many of those were about whether Apple was playing by some "righteous" set of open-source community rules or if they were "pandering to the gods" of DRM.

This latter is a religious issue and probably not worth considering.

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Why would I want to look at Apple's software with DTrace?

I can see the point of looking at my code with DTrace - if I find something amiss, or if I find something inefficient, I can fix it. If I don't have access to the source code then I couldn't care less what it looks like in DTrace. Doesn't matter. It's unimportant. And as for the DRM is bad argument, I know. So does everyone else. We've been crapping on about it being bad for years - doesn't make a blind bit of difference though. So enough already.

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Believe it or not

Sometimes someone else's code can cause problems on your system. DTrace can help you determine problems in any application on Solaris systems... not so on Mac. And - here's a real shocker for some posters - even if you don't have the source code, this doesn't prevent you from contacting the original developer with a detailed bug report.

Also, it is possible to repair/hack compiled code for which you do not have the source. I'm not saying it's easy, but it is doable (with the help of a hex editor, and particularly with the help of a diagnostic tool like DTrace).

So just because some developers are only capable of debugging their own code doesn't mean this is applicable to all developers.

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