back to article Mobile spying service leaked sensitive details to the masses

The makers of Mobile Spy like to tout their tool for secretly tracking calls and text messages on smart phones as the perfect way to monitor employees or teens or catch cheating spouses. According to F-Secure, the service was also a way to leak sensitive information to anyone with a web browser. For $20 per month or $100 for a …

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Lie down with dogs

Get up with fleas.

I am amused that anyone would be surprised that hiring out dodgy work carries a risk of backfiring. "Honor among thieves" is a fable for the marks.

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Mike

Quite agree. Problem is, the paranoid eavesdroppers are not the ones getting screwed here, it's the poor sods who're being spied on by snooping spouses (spice?), employers, parents etc who're having their private texts and call histories accessed by random strangers.

Bad enough being a big enough prick to snoop on someone else's phone without getting it done in such a way the whole world can snoop.

Great conversation:

"Hey, we've found a vuln in your system."

"Impossible, it can't be done."

"What about this evidence?"

""

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Anonymous Coward

PayPal should be held liable as well

I find it amazing how companies such as Flexispy and Mobile Spy can sell products that are obviously illegal in most countries. Governments have to go through great lengths to get permission to eavesdrop on their citizens, yet companies such as Flexyspy can sell their products to the masses. If nobody can stop them from selling them, then why not go after the PayPal? They are a publicly traded company, yet they are the ones who allow these types of products to be sold. Without PayPal it would be difficult to sell these products. I've checked the PayPal acceptable use policies and they state on their own site that these types of products are prohibited from being sold. When I contacted PayPal and reported them, they simply replied "we are investigating" but its been several weeks and nothing has been done. This is an outrage. PayPal obviously thinks more about profit, then what is sold via their services.

P

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eavesdrop on their citizens

"Governments have to go through great lengths to get permission to eavesdrop on their citizens"

Unfortunately, it would appear that's no longer the case in this so called 'democracy' the UK

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/articles/news/news.html?in_article_id=484752&in_page_id=1770&ct=5

It makes you feel physically sick.

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Gold badge

Nice breach of the Computer Misuse Act..

Phones are computers too, and anyone caught installing this software should be immediately reported to the police for breach of the Computer Misuse Act. The company itself could possible be considered encouraging a breach of the same Act so I'm sure there's plenty of scope to create trouble for them.

It appears that not letting the phone out of your sight is becoming more important than ever, because it's not just Windows based phones that can be 'tapped'. What's more, it takes even less effort to set up a tracker, and the one pathetic SMS warning a month means you just "borrow" the phone, set up the tracker and delete the starting permission SMS. After that you hand back the phone and enjoy a full month during which your victim doesn't have a clue (s)he's being location tracked.

Privacy? We've heard of it - long ago.

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