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back to article Clarins' electromagnetic-blocking cream ad blocked

There's no evidence to suggest that Clarins Expertise 3P beauty cream will protect users from electromagnetic radiation, the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) has found. Clarins launched Expertise 3P in January to general ridicule, and the product provoked six false advertising complaints to the ASA. The ASA investigation …

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Anonymous Coward

electromagnetic waves damaging skin...

How about UV? sunburn? skin cancer?

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Anonymous Coward

Cosmetic rays

You gotta laff at this lot, and the people that buy it.

For years they've been promoting "anti oxidants" for skincare, perhaps with good reason.

But more recently one of the big names, I forget which, has been promoting a skincare potion which "oxygenates" the skin.

What was bad, is good.

Most odd.

It's a real shame most of the world know more about (eg) football than science.

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Brilliant!

Another outstanding piece of 'made up science' (tm) from the cosmetics industry. Keep 'em coming guys, we need more pro-vitamins, micro-minerals, pro-liposomes, anti-ageing-serums etc, etc, etc to laugh at.

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You mean it doesn't work?!

Dammit - here I was thinking that this might be able to put away my tinfoil hat, slap a layer of this stuff on my deforested head and be safe in the knowledge that I'd be protected from the mind-sapping rays of the Lizard Army[tm] and sudden attacks of black helicopters. To say I'm disappointed would be an understatement.

Truth be told, one of the things I miss about TV is not having a bloody good laugh at the pseudo-scientific claims of Clarins, L'Oreal, Garnier etc.etc.

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The Truth Be Known

It's not just the cosmetic industry that's trading on pseudo science. Recently, while channel surfing, I came across an advertisement for DNA designed fishing lures. Apparently the lures were designed to appeal to the fish's DNA. How stuff like that works is well beyond my limited intellect. Still though, transcribing DNA into consumer products looks like the way to go career wise.

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Anonymous Coward

Time for the health warning

Every product should be made to carry a warning: "Advertising nonsense from the manufacturer of this product could damage your wealth".

However, it's good to see that on this one rare occasaion, the ASA has actually managed to put its brains in gear and declare the claim to be rubbish.

But I suppose it's too much to ask them to have a look at the dictionary while their brain is still in gear, and look up what "unlimited" means ... no, nobody in ASA has anywhere near sufficient stamina to actually READ what the dictionary says about unlimited AND understand it.

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Damage from electromagnetic waves

If they tested this against, say, 1500 watts at 2.9GHz, I might start to believe them.

Meanwhile I'm making a new tinfoil hat to protect my brain from my WiFi. And I'm using my Bluetooth headset to avoid putting my phone against my head and getting all those nasty radio waves. The phone will stay securely on my hip. Where I am safe from radiation.

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Claims in beauty products

The ASA are actually quite hot of false claims in cosmetics ads, they are consistently complained about, more than any other adverts and the complaints are upheld pretty much all the time. You'll probably notice if you look out for it that many adverts appear once or twice and are never seen of again, whereas some are used for years.

It's just a shame that they don't do the same for IT claims - Unlimited Broadband usage etc.

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Re: Cosmetic rays

"""For years they've been promoting "anti oxidants" for skincare, perhaps with good reason.

But more recently one of the big names, I forget which, has been promoting a skincare potion which "oxygenates" the skin.

What was bad, is good."""

Your comment would be right, assuming that an oxidant actually oxygenates things. I believe that 'oxygenates' would mean 'adds oxygen to,' while 'oxidization' merely means that the oxidization numbers of ions and molecules involved are changed - Oxygen isn't even necessarily involved.

It would, therefore, be perfectly possible for a single creame to be an anti-oxidant and to also oxygenate the skin.

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Department of Homeland Security

Fantastic! If I smear this stuff on my phone, I can be sure I can't be snooped. Then again, I won't be able to make any calls either! Back to the drawing board Clarins.

How about a cream with Pro® Sony® Thermio®, that hides the seven signs of a small bonfire in your laptop case?

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Dillon..don't throw away the tinfoil just yet

If you put your phone er, 'down there', I would suggest some tinfoil underpants might be a sensible precaution.

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@MattW

I think you'll find that's "make-up science" (tm)

I'll get me coat.

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Oxygen

While oxidation doesn't require oxygen, oxygen is, naturally enough, an oxidising agent. Particularly because I don't believe they'd be allowed to sell some sort of oxygen-bubble foam without warnigns about flammability the "oxygen" must be some sort of compound which is at best inert and not going to supply free oxygen to the skin or at worst a generator of oxygen free radicals...

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Anonymous Coward

Sanity rules

albeit briefly. I'm sure next month there will be another Nutrio Pro-Fiction Anti-Terrorism cream that protects you from bomb blasts.

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Make-up pseudo-science

I love the one with the "pentapeptides are the worst kept secret in beauty and make you look all youthful and hot!".

So they go to all the effort of getting that old woman to talk about it, and show the "before" pictures... yet they don't bother to make her use it and show what it (supposedly) does by showing her looking youthful and/or hot.

It's advertising gone mad, is what it is.

I'm off to buy some tampons so I can go inline skating.

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my magic rock works

I've seen no lizzard army or black helicopters so it must work.

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What about the food industry

Anyone for Biffidus Digestivum - which could make your digestive system "work better" if you are 300 miles of the martian surface, hanging upside down with a banana sticking out of one ear and an anti-gravity device in the other.......

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