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back to article 'Portable' CD player puts MP3 into a spin

During the transition period between technology formats, such from CDs to MP3s, consumers inevitably go through a period where they want 'all in one' players'. So, one designer has developed a concept MP3-cum-CD player that promises to play MP3 and traditional CDs, but in a way that’s anything but traditional. The DMP looks …

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Anonymous Coward

Rubbish

Given that CDs need a nice dark environment to work and a CD spinning at around 500rpm (centre) to 200rpm (edge) this is going to be poor.

Lost fingers, music skipping and the fact that this solution is not mobile I would stay well clear.

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Am I the only one.....

That thinks this is awesomely awesome? In a weird, niche kind of way? :D

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I'm, Spinning around

No Touchy!

Keep your hands to yourself!

But seriously - Health and Safety anyone? Can chop your hands off with that thing !!!

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nice

Stick some ripping software in there and that would be perfect.

I have to admit I really like the concept of that.

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Third use?

I wonder if it can serve a third purpose - as an angle grinder?

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Plastic cover?

I'm sure it wouldn't be too hard to come up with a style of caddy system that holds the CDs in storage and can be slotted in to the player when in use.

Nice design, particularly if you can rip the CD music and store on the flash ram.

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I Guess The Question Is...

...will it be able to rip the CD to it's internal MP3 storage?

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Incredible

What would make this useful would be if it can do highspeed ripping of CDs onto it's memory. I doubt I'd carry it around and a box of CDs to play when I get somewhere I could use it.

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Anonymous Coward

Ripper?

If it'll rip the inserted CD it makes more sense.

TeeCee

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Reminds me of the Audio Technica Soundburger

Reminds me of a device marketed by Audio Technica (better known for tonearms and pickup cartridges for turntables) in the 1980s called the Soundburger:

http://www.retrothing.com/2005/11/sound_burger_vi.html

I got one from Rumbelows (remember them?), heavily discounted to £25 from about £90 (guess they didn't sell).

Bizarre as it might seem, the audio quality was astonishingly good.

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Back in the day, Sony ...

Back when the little mini-CDs were first introduced, Sony had a very small mini-CD player that was 'open' on two of the adjoining sides. By opening the lid and sliding the spindle diagonally from the center of the player out to the corner where these 2 open sides met, you could mount and play a regular-sized CD, 3/4s of which spun exposed outside the case. What's old is new, I guess.

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Nice design...

...especially as others have said, if it rips....

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Could be a handy tool

...I don't know about how often I'd use one to play CDs, but if it could burn DVD or even Blu-Ray...

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Bronze badge

de ja vu

Im sure I've seen this method before?

Ah no I remember it was a half a walkman cassette player from hong kong in about 93-ish. it had half the tape sticking out the side... damn if only i could find a link to a picture...

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LPs?

I remember a record player that looked like this. Never caught on, for some reason.

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Gav
Bronze badge

ripping & blinding

Course it'll rip. Your hands, your clothes. Just about anything it comes in contact with.

And think of the fun that'll be possible with that exposed laser.

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Lovely

I had a very small CD player about 15 years ago, a small square affair which covered slightly more than a quarter of the playing CD. Unfortunately it died.

This is a great idea and would be even better if it could record the CD's content, MP3 encoded, in its internal memory.

What faff about slicing your fingers off, putting it in your packet, ... pah!

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Stu

More room how?

So how does opening the unit the way it does create more room for a CD to fit? It clearly rotates around the central hub point - wouldn't give you any more space - I'd wager the CD fits just fine with the unit 'closed'.

Of course, it's just a gimmick, looks ultra-modern, and as is the case, means lack of basic practicality - it really wont work anywhere but sat on a flat surface.

@'Rubbish' guy - In this unit, it appears the CD read head is indeed enclosed in a darkened area in the main body, for the read head to work just fine. All CD players have a little external light falling onto the opto-electronics, but this method appears to allow even less light into it because its just a thin slit for the CD surface to occupy. I'd wager the design even keeps the lens cleaner for longer.

But other than that its a machine for the table and nothing more.

All CDs though, are not made equal, and some are slightly warped. The CD specs state that there is quite a large degree of variation in the shape allowed before it will stop working - ie if you put in a warped disk it will undoubtedly grind against the slit edges and scratch your disks!

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FLAC / OGG?

1. Will it support FLAC or OGG files?

2. Will it be yet another MP3 player that is locked into the Windows environment.

3. If yes to 2 will it be encumbered with DRM?

4. What is the battery life?

If no to 1 and yes to 2 then it is no good to me as an portable music player. I will stick to my Trekstor Vibez (terrible name, brilliant product) as it can play multiple formats and works well with Linux. I am also not bothered with poor quality rips so I use the FLAC format.

More importantly, if I am listening to a CD and I encounter trouble of the streets, is it possible to use the contraption to flick the CD at my enemy frisbee style to disable them?

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Re: Rubbish

"..CD spinning at around 500rpm (centre) to 200rpm (edge).."

Interesting ideas about the laws of physics there Jimmy-boy... so the centre of the disc (which is fairly solid and not actually much like a fluid at all) spins round 2.5 times for every revolution the edge of the CD performs? Wrong is soo many ways..

perhaps you are thinking of angular velocity, in which case the edge moves *faster* than the centre as it has does the *same* number of revolutions, but has further to travel, hence it has a *higher* angular velocity

Unless, of cource, the concept DMP has some sort of space/time warping effect, in which case better call Kylie - I mean the Doctor

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Silver badge

@Rubbish

Methinks a CD revolving at 500rpm centre and 200rpm edge won't stay in one piece long enough to chop fingers, skip music etc. The SPEED in cm/sec will vary between edge & centre, but not the rpm.

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Anonymous Coward

To prove there's nothing new in this world

Check out the Sony Discman D-88, an early 90's CD player which did much the same thing - albeit without the MP3 capability.

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spinning tops dangerous?

A lightweight disk spinning at 1x rate (500rpm max) can’t be considered as being anywhere near as dangerous as a spinning top.

OK it's not really practical - but it is a visual gizmo so I would still have one. Pity it won't look so good when playing the 'home made' backup disks....ahem!

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Bronze badge

errr...

"500rpm (centre) to 200rpm (edge)"

Haha fell off my chair what an idiot..

BTW folks this is not a 48X data disc its a 1x Audio Player!

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Silver badge

Dark environment ...

Erm, the entire CD doesn't have to be in a dark environment, just the bit that contains the reading head. And even in this case, there is some leeway available as it doesn't have to be 100% dark, just with enough "contrast" in the light levels of laser/not-laser to accurately read the CD track.

As for removing fingers, these discs don't go round that fast, don't have sharp edges and have very little mass behind them so are largely harmless. still wouldn't recommend gently running soft skin (like fingers) on the edges when they're running, but they certainly wouldn't remove a finger. Biggest problem is likely to be the practical problems of keeping the disc spinning at a constant speed in an environment where there are things to get in it's way, dust, hair, dirt, etc to fall onto the disc and all manner of other problems. Besides which, how do you actually hold such a device and without jamming digits / clothes, etc into the mechanism or just dropping the headphone cable into it's mechanism?

Nice concept, will never go anywhere.

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Anonymous Coward

Original Design?

Who sez the design is original? Check the Sound Burger portable LP player for the Walkman generation at http://www.retrothing.com/2005/11/sound_burger_vi.html .

Are they perhaps related?

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Anonymous Coward

Hahaha

"a CD spinning at around 500rpm (centre) to 200rpm (edge)"

Does anyone else here find this statement hilarious?

The 'rpm' speed of a CD is the same in the centre as on the edge, genius.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Am I the only one.....

No, I think it is awesome as well... practical, no, awesome, absoltuely.

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LCD Display?

Funny, I only see one LCD, not some kind shop-window style display unit containing a few.

Nice Compact CD Disk player though -- I'd have one just for novelty value.

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Silver badge

Awesome product! But would never buy it..

I love that product! granted I would never find a use for it, but it's certainly got a certain, as the French say "I don't know what".

To counter the criticisms, it wouldn't be all that harmful - we've all tried fooling a discman into playing while the lid was open. Unless you're sharpening the edges of your cd's, there isn't enough angular momentum to hurt you. I've managed to stop a CD spinning in said open discman. Also, it only needs a dark environment where the laser is - from what I can see, one of the legs(?) would house the laser and would be dark enough.

Still, would never buy one...

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Bronze badge

Just brilliant design...

I don't care if it isn't portable, I don't care if it doesn't work on the move..

It is a great example of thinking "outside the box"...er, literally.

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didnt batman use one of these?

in batman returns?

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Vinyl?

If you can get a version that'll play LPs, I'd be up for that. Bit of a bugger to carry around in a hip pocket, though.

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Law

annnnnd

they should have:

- ripping to internal storage,

- ability to act as an external USB CD/DVD drive for PC's

- ability to write to DVD/CD from a PC and it's internal mp3's storage

- ability to read mp3 cds/dvds

- wifi abilities - so we can all share the music we rip! :)

But most importantly, once all these features are added (and DRM free btw), it already has the ability to turn upright, point at recordindustry/apple/microsoft - and give them the V's! :)

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RE: Rubbish

Can you expand on how a CD travels at a different RPM at different points on the disk?

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Portable CD Ripper

Would be freakin' sweet if it could rip CDs, or even make images of them on the go.

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Dom

Use your noggins

The rpm varies depending which bit of the disc is being played, hence "500rpm (centre) to 200rpm (edge)".

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Anonymous Coward

Holy Crap!!

...CD spinning at around 500rpm (centre) to 200rpm (edge) ...

The torque in that thing when it finishes playing must be something incredible - mind your fingers when you change discs everyone!

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Anonymous Coward

Nyyeeeeearrrghhh! <crosses legs>

@ Nick Pettefar:

" What faff about slicing your fingers off, putting it in your packet "

Man, if that thing's got a razor sharp edge rotating at 200rpm, the *last* place I'm going to be putting it is anywhere even *near* my packet...

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Anonymous Coward

Doubt...

Unless the manufacturer has decided to use a chainsaw engine to rotate the CD, I seriously doubt that it would be possible to injure yourself, shred clothing, etc. with this. That said, obviously you're not going to be able to use this as a portable when playing a CD, and what of the 'Warning invisible laser light' stickers that all laser equipment has--seems like it'd be pretty easy to look into the laser compared to a 'normal' device.

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Anonymous Coward

Luke's rubbish.

" "..CD spinning at around 500rpm (centre) to 200rpm (edge).."

Interesting ideas about the laws of physics there Jimmy-boy... so the centre of the disc (which is fairly solid and not actually much like a fluid at all) spins round 2.5 times for every revolution the edge of the CD performs? Wrong is soo many ways..

perhaps you are thinking of angular velocity "

YOU FAIL.

He was thinking of the well-known technique that CD players use to maintain constant linear velocity under the head: they spin the disc faster when reading the regions near the centre than when reading the regions near the edge.

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Re: Re: Rubbish

Hey Luke,

Its you that's got CD physics wrong, not our Jimmy. CDs are read out at a constant linear velocity (CLV) which means they rotate less quickly when the head's at the edge than when its in the middle (starting point). Jimmy's referring to the head's position, not a point on the disk.

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Not @Rubbish

The first post relates to the speed of the disk when reading from the centre or the edge of the disk, not the speed of the disc at that location.

When reading from the edge the disk, it spins slower, than when reading from the centre.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Constant_linear_velocity

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Constant_angular_velocity

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Rotation speed

I think what the original poster said about different rotation speeds is correct. He's not saying that different parts of the disk spin at different speeds at the same time (which would obviously break it), but that the whole disk spins at different speeds depending on which part of the disk is being read at the time.

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Anonymous Coward

Lawsuits, weapons and the rotation thing

In this age of litigation over stupid stuff, the manual probably weighs 2 pounds, 1.9 of which are pages of disclaimers and safety warnings so that they can't be sued by some pillock who got a booboo on their pinky finger from a spinning CD. Dateline NBC will probably run a sensational horror piece about people having limbs severed by this anyway, and will modify it to spin the disc at 10,000rpm just to make sure they get the result they want...

How about an improvised weapon? Sharpen the edge of a CD, maybe put some serrations on there. Or fashion something similar but deadlier out of a mini CD with a sharpened metal normal-CD-sized rim attached? Hours of fun for all the family!

On the rotation speed thing: the *entire* CD spins at 500rpm while playing at the start of the CD (in the center) and 200rpm when playing right at the end of a full 74/78 minutes (the outer edge of the disc), or somewhere in between the two depending on how far toward the end of the disc playback has reached. That way the surface speed passing by the laser is always constant. Though a CD spinning at two speeds at the same time would be quite a thing to behold, preferably from behind a sheet of plexiglass or similar. :)

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@ the RPM Pedants

When reading data from the disk the machine needs to change the CDs RPM. When the data is read from the inside it spins at 500 RPM, decreasing slowly as it reads through all the data across the disc until it slows to 200 RPM for the data round the outside edge.

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Anonymous Coward

500 rpm / 200 rpm

Oh, geez...

FFS... 500 rpm when it is READING FROM THE CENTER, and 200 rpm when it is READING FROM THE EDGE, because AUDIO CDs must keep the same LINEAR speed when reading...

Yes, CD-ROMs are CAVs (continous angular velocity) so when they are read from the edge, they are read FASTER. The RPMs are kept constant in this case.

In short, there is a difference between how Audio CDs and CD-ROMs are read, or at least back then when the technology came out. Everything now should be CAV...

Tong in cheek?

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Oh Dear...

Why do people have to write such ignorant, smart@rse comments?

The original poster was CORRECT inasmuch as the RPM of a CD *does* change from the centre to the edge. However, they meant throughout the DURATION of the playback - from centre (programme start) to edge (programme end), and NOT at any one moment in time! - D'oh!

CDs are recorded in what's known as a CLV format (constant linear velocity) as opposed to CAV (constant angular velocity) - so the rotational speed gradually slows down towards the end of the recording.

It's usually a good idea to check your understanding of the facts before taking the p*ss out of other people.

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Will anyone buy it?

Sure it's a clever design but will anyone buy it? It clearly isn't a player you can use on the move as the rotating disk will snag on pockets or bags so I'm not sure where it'll be useful. I do think there is life in the MP3/Ogg format on a portable CD player but not in this form factor. You'll struggle to find any portable CD player these days as cheap MP3 players, especially flash based ones, have killed the market.

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Luke and Ted Treen

I think what Rubbish meant was that the CD spins at 500rpm when the head is reading data from the middle of the disc, and 200rpm when it's reading data from the outside of the disc. I hope so anyway, otherwise physics has indeed been warped.

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