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back to article Researchers ease LCD viewing angle woes

Researchers at a Taiwanese university have developed an LCD that tracks a viewer’s movements and then adjusts its settings to give the optimum display. It’s claimed the design can therefore overcome blurred or distorted images when viewing the screen from an angle. The prototype display, developed at the National Chiao Tung …

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Bad news for

Conjoined twins

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Anonymous Coward

Yeah but....

...what happens when more than one person tries to view the screen?

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Anonymous Coward

Parties

So what happens when you have several people all looking at the screen from different angles to watch a film or something?

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Big head

"what happens when more than one person tries to view the screen?"

It chooses the person with the biggest head, obviously.

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Most likely

It will soon be exploited by javascript to make _sure_ there's an advertisement wherever your eyes are looking.

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Silver badge

Brilliant

So whoever moves the most, gets to see the telly better than the rest of the people in the room...

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Watching DVDs

So how, I wonder, might this new LCD adjust when two or three people huddle around the screen to watch a DVD? Will the software adjust accordingly to suit each viewer or only the first? Whose eye movement will be tracked?

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Tracking the remote

It will, of course, primarily track whoever holds the remote, aka "the instrument of ultimate power".

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Bang & Olufsen?

Didn't they have a range of TV's that rotated to face the person pressing the remote?

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Anonymous Coward

Head movement

It's tracking head movement, not eye movement. It won't be able to tell which portion of the screen you're looking at - just where your head is in relation to the screen. They're two entirely different things, and serve two entirely different functions.

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I dont no if its just me but

My Samsung 42" R88 series tv (Samsung Panel) doesnt suffer from this problem as far as I can tell the image doesnt discolour or look weird from off center angles I suppose it depends on the quality of the actual panel in the first place ?

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Anonymous Coward

Eh?

mmm... I don't get it. Why would you want to view the screen at an angle? The keyboard is right in front and presentations are usually done via a connected projector, so why

I just can't think of any scenarios where I'd have to view at an angle.

Technology for technology's sake me thinks.

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Anonymous Coward

A telescreen ??

A TV installed in your living room with a built in camera. Hmm. sounds almost orwellian in nature. How long before all TVs have built in cameras and net connections for “automatic updates”. Sooner rather than later they will all be stealthy switched over from RF reception to government approved broadcasting, streamed from the net, perhaps centrally controlled from somewhere called the “Ministry of Truth”. Live recordings from your living room will be screened 24hrs for the purpose of “finding terrorists”. Yes indeed. Good times ahead.

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Sony Bravia's....

... already have a 170 degree angle of view with their S-PVA panels.

Or did I miss something so obvious it's as invisible as Microsoft's WGA? :P

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Bronze badge

Why bother?

The LCD screen is a monstosity that deserves to go the way of parallel port and the floppy. Park it right next to the super drive.

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Re: Sony Bravia's

I just got a KDL40-V2500, which isn't even the latest generation, and the image is still viewable in brightness/contrast terms long after it becomes unwatchable due to perspective.

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@Anon

"It's tracking head movement, not eye movement. It won't be able to tell which portion of the screen you're looking at - just where your head is in relation to the screen. They're two entirely different things, and serve two entirely different functions."

From the article:

"The Taiwanese researchers have also claimed they are already working on improvements to the system by replacing the camera with an infra-red sensor that tracks a user’s eye movements instead"

Read first. Comment later.

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RE: A telescreen?

Your comment was along the lines of my first thoughts. However, I was soon reminded of the recent news regarding Bush signing a bill into law that broadens the federal government's electronic eavesdropping powers. I then realized that the only reason we don't already live in such a scenario is that there hasn't been a corporation insightful enough to realize the profit potential in first creating the device for US consumers, then secretly selling software to the US govt. that allows them access to these devices via the internet.

Or is this what this article is really about?

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