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back to article US cons attempt copyright-based prison break

Four inmates of Oklahoma's El Reno federal prison were yesterday indicted for what must rate as the most audicious prison break scheme in history, the Washington Post reports. Clayton Heath Albers, Carl Ervin Batts, Barry Dean Bischof and Russell Dean Landers are alleged to have copyrighted their names then "demanded millions …

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Extortion

...and a $250,000 fine on a charge of "mailing threatening communications with the intent to extort"

Are you sure they don't work for the RIAA?

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Anonymous Coward

Only in the USA...

Would it have worked if the guy they hired wasn't an FBI agent I wonder? Even MS managed to scare Novell-SuSE into a shotgun wedding. Blackmail? Nah, just trying to enforce copyright laws guv.

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Look on the bright side

The RIAA will testify on their behalf at their next parole hearings

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News of the Weird

This has got to make News of the Weird, even if I have to mail it in. Classic case of criminals too dumb for their own good.

"The RIAA will testify on their behalf at their next parole hearings"

And have job offers?

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Copyrighting names

From what I've seen in the U.S., there is widespread belief among inner-city minorities that "common law" copyright can be claimed in a person's name, and is secured merely by publishing a paid announcement of that claim in any obscure, limited-distribution neighborhood advertising rag.

It's clear from such "legal notices" that the "owners" believe there exists an animal that combines trademark with copyright. Violations automatically result in forfeiture of the offender's personal assets up to the penalty amount announced in the "legal notice," and judges have no hesitation (or discretion) in ordering turnover without contest.

Given that context, no surprise that a jailhouse lawyer hatched this plan.

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Silver badge

Something I'm missing here

Aren't these guys in prison ? How did they get in contact with the FBI guy, by posting a notice on the Web ?

Aren't prisoners supposed to be shut off from society during their term, or am I just thinking like last century ?

I'm all for reintegrating prisoners into society - else they'll just end up back in prison (happens a lot anyway from what I hear) - but when they are in jail their communications with outside should really be controlled better.

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Anonymous Coward

Anybody like to let Pascal in on it

Now I know you don't think the FBI has

people doing this just for grins . Prisoners

computer time is strictly monitored

it was a matter of simply giving them some rope they are

watched, video'd and every bit of communication is filtered

Just thought I would clear that up.

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