back to article Iraq base plans left on open servers

Reporters trawling un-indexed FTP servers have recently been able to download large amounts of secret US military data, it has been revealed. Documents found included plans of a new military prison camp in Iraq and a fuel dump in Afghanistan - both likely to be targets for insurgents. Associated Press hacks who carried out the …

COMMENTS

This topic is closed for new posts.

Yes you can

Actually, if you know how to, you can Google up ftp servers.

0
0

All your base are belong to us.

...Sorry, the context of the article really was begging for it.

*digs hole*

0
0

Oxymoron

"less tech-savvy people in the US military-industrial complex"

As Groucho Marx pointed out, military intelligence is a contradiction in terms.

0
0
Anonymous Coward

Mission accomplished

You read stuff like this, then hear "The safety of our troops is important" from spokesmen from the Outhouse, it just makes you laugh. I'm suprised there wasn't a guard list and rotation schedule included.

0
0

Blast...

...you beat me to it. Damn meeting made me miss the first opportunity to use AYBABT since a long time ;-)

Bytus

(off searching for more plans)

0
0
Anonymous Coward

when is hacking legal?

I'm certainly not a legal eagle, nor do I care much for the harsh sentences handed out to "hackers" throughout the world, but why is it that when hacking (not that this was really hacking, but I'm sure you get the point) is done by a journalist, it is not followed up by the 'authorities' seeking a prison sentence?

If a teenager in America, or anywhere in the world had found this massive security failing, and posted the information on the Internet, just like AP has, that teenager would be looking at a 70 year prison sentence (Google for Gary McKinnon).

When will the authorities start treating everybody the same? Either seek a prison sentence or not, either way suits me!!

0
0

RE: when is hacking legal?

You see, if 'the authorities' started seeking prison sentences for reporters and researchers checking up on their security, then it would dissuade them from carrying out these investigations in future.

It wouldn't make the problem go away. All it would mean is that we, the public supposedly protected by these agencies, wouldn't be aware of their failure.

Those out there looking to find such holes for malicious reasons are unlikely to be deterred by the threat of trial, because, presumably, they see themselves in conflict with said agencies already.

Hiding the problem is not a solution. Security through obscurity doesn't work.

0
0
Anonymous Coward

The meaning of Bismillah.

Q1. When should we use the basmalah (the statement Bismillaahir Rahmaanir Rahmeen)?

Every matter of importance should be begun with the basmalah. So both oral and written matters should be begun with this.

Q2. Which Prophet who used the basmalah is mentioned in the Qur’aan?

Sulaymaan ‘alaiyhissalaam (Solomon) used the basmalah when writing to Bilqees, the Queen of Saba.

"O Chiefs! There has been delivered to me a noble letter. It is from Sulaymaan, and it reads: bismillaah ir rahmaan ir raheem." - Soorah(Chapter) an-Naml (27) aayaat(verses) 29 to 30

Q3. Where does the basmalah occur in the Quraan as part of an aayah(verse) rather than as an independent aayah(verse)?

It occurs in this aayah(verse) mentioning the letter that Sulaymaan (Solomon) ‘alaiyhissalaam wrote to Bilqees.

The shaykh(scholar), Shaykh Saalih al Fawzaan hafidhahullaah holds the opinion that in all other places where the basmalah is mentioned in the Qur’aan, the basmalah occurs as an independent aayah(verse) and not actually part of the Soorah (chapter) itself.

Q4. What meaning is implied by saying ‘bismillaah’ even though it is not actually stated?

That which is left unstated when a person says bismillaah is:

In the name of Allaah, I seek aid and in the name of Allaah, I seek blessing.

Q5. What purpose is served by something having a particular name?

It distinguishes it from other things (which do not have that name).

Q6. Which of the names of Allaah is intended when we say ‘bismillaah’ (‘in the name of Allaah’)?

When one says in the name of Allaah, he intends by this all the names of Allaah.

0
0
Silver badge

What about responsability ?

Don't you just love how you can read, year after year, how those who are in charge of security fail dismally at actually being secure, and that none of the errors are followed by any kind of sanction, and hardly any improvement ?

Did anyone get fired after this latest security failure was revealed ? Did any company lose a contract ? Did anyone get a public shaming and a note in his employment record ?

And does anyone thing anything is going to change by making this information public ? We all know that the government and its organizations are years behind in security matters. It appears things are not really getting any better.

0
0
Anonymous Coward

Relevance?

And just WHERE is the Paris Hilton / iPhone link here? Come on forget this IT crap and get back to the REAL stuff!!!!

0
0
Anonymous Coward

Security?

It is not the Yanks alone who are lax in security arrangements. Having been in the R.A.F. I can quote plenty of security lapses which were, potentially, catastrophic to the security of our country and some of it's weapons.

0
0
This topic is closed for new posts.

Forums