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back to article Harassed employees: dispute resolutions are failing

Workplace dispute resolution procedures make cases of discrimination worse and do not benefit the victim, according to sufferers of harassment on grounds of religion or sexual orientation. In a new survey by employment relations and arbitration body ACAS, the victims of religious and sexual orientation-related abuse said …

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Silver badge

I know it's old-fashioned....

...to be a member of a union, but when I had problems at work my union sent a representative to support me. He ensured that procedures were followed properly and that I was treated fairly. Their help was much appreciated and, considering the monthly outlay of £5 membership dues, was very good value.

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Anonymous Coward

Oh, please

If you're not happy in a job, just leave. Get another one - and try to make a bit more effort in the next one to get on with people. Union representatives, tribunals, discrimination, blah blah blah. Grow up.

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Anonymous Coward

Harassment is real and leaving not always an option

My wife is now waiting for the outcome of a bullying suit she lodged last year within the Australian Public Service.

She is "fortunate" in that she has umpteen witnesses, written chains of evidence (including slanderous comments scrawled across files) and a personal work history of excellence including her work being used as a national example of good reporting. The bullying was sustained over a period of months.

Her claim, against her boss, is about outright bullying, nothing related to sexual orientation or religious practices.

She does have the disadvantage of not only being a union member but being the local union representative and as such being very much on the wrong side of the politics in Australia at present with the "Work Choices" legislation.

With regards to "just leave" - sorry but

1) it is not always that easy to get another job, especially once you are over 40

2) within the Australian PS at least, once EITHER of the parties in a case leaves, the case is dropped. No penalties, no black marks on a record, no closure and the bully is free to go ahead and carry out their behaviour with other victims. (My wife was not the only victim in this case.)

"grow up' yourself

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Silver badge

Proportionality?

There is a huge difference between the experience the previous poster mentions, and the majority of claims. The first, on the basis of the statements made, would be classed as bad work practice by any standard, and deserves to be persued. However, too many cases are being brought by people with a chip on their shoulder and an eye on a compensation cheque. Having the p**s taken out of you for any one of a million things is part of being in a group - it isn't harrassment, it is acceptance. That is where people should grow up and accept that their feelings are not the most important thing. If they can't do that, they are incapable of working as part of a team, and should leave.

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reality check

Posted Thursday 5th April 2007 13:41 GMT

If you're not happy in a job, just leave. Get another one - and try to make a bit more effort in the next one to get on with people. Union representatives, tribunals, discrimination, blah blah blah. Grow up.

SO you are saying that if some is calling me racial slurs I should leave ??

No punishment for them. Were do you draw the line. When the person says they are going to hurt me . Maybe its not me. But hey let me get a job at your your place of work and I'll make it impossible for you to work.

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